Awards and Decorations

Awards and Decorations

The First World War 1914-1919

VICTORIA CROSS
Lt. Harcus Strachan MC
For most conspicuous bravery and leadership during operations. He took command of the squadron of his regiment when the squadron leader, approaching the enemy front line at a gallop, was killed. Lieutenant Strachan led the squadron through the enemy line of machine gun posts, and then with the surviving men, led the charge on the enemy battery, killing seven of the gunners with his sword. All the gunners having been killed and the battery silenced, he rallied his men and fought his way back at night through the enemy’s line, bringing all unwounded men safely in, together with fifteen prisoners. The operation, which resulted in the silencing of an enemy battery, the killing of the whole battery personnel and many infantry, and the cutting of three main lines of telephone communication two miles in rear of the enemy’s front line, was only rendered possible by the outstanding gallantry and fearless leading of this officer. (Cambrai. 20 November 1917.)


COMMANDER OF THE MOST EXCELLENT ORDER OF ST. MICHAEL AND ST. GEORGE

BGen Robert Walter Paterson


DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER

Lt. James Moore Dunwoody DCM
In the action at the Bois de Gattigny on October 9th, 1918, he was sent with his troop to ride down enemy machine guns on the right flank of the position at P.25a. In order to draw their fire, and if possible to capture their machine guns, thus enabling the right flank of the enemy’s position to be turned, he rode with his troops over 2,000 yards constantly under machine gun fire, and while he and a number of his troops became casualties, he succeeded in driving the enemy from the guns, of which about fifteen were captured. This officer’s great gallantry and determination prevented heavy casualties and by silencing the machine guns at this point made a continuation of the advance possible.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
Maj Edward Liddell Middlemast
On the morning of October 9th, 1918, he was in charge of advanced guard squadron of the regiment, and located the enemy with many machine guns in the Bois-du-Mont Aux-Villes and Bois-de-Gattigny. After successfully sizing up the situation and timing himself with the advancing infantry, he charged the wood with the sword around the enemy’s right flank, killing large numbers and capturing approximately 200 prisoners and 20 machine guns. Although wounded in this charge, he, after having his wound dressed, resumed command of his squadron and did valuable work during the remainder of the day. He did splendid work.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
LCol Robert Walter Paterson CMG
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. By his daring reconnaissances and careful organisation he ensured the success of a raid against four lines of enemy defences. He personally reconnoitred the point of attack with an utter disregard of his personal safety. (9 January 1918)

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
Maj. Wallace James Sharpe
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty’s Birthday; 1918

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
LCol Herbert Irving Stevenson
votion to duty. When our line was temporarily pierced, he led a charge with great skill and dash, by which the enemy were driven back and a new line established. He succeeded in establishing communication with the troops on his right flank, and though heavily outnumbered maintained this line until relieved by fresh infantry units. His prompt action and cool leadership were the means of allowing two battalions of infantry, who were in danger of being cut off, to withdraw safely to our line. (London Gazette – 22 June 1918)

Commanded the Canadian Brigade Detachment, in Mounted Detachment in 3rd Cavalry Division, during the Actions of 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 March 1918.

At VILLESELVE, after the Infantry line had been broken, he led the mounted attack, around the right flank of the village, drove the enemy back and organised a new line from the NE edge of the village, to the left flank of the French position in BOIS DE REINE. He held this line until reinforced by reorganised British Infantry, and later covered the retirement of the Infantry, on BERLANCOURT. His splendid dash and cool leadership, undoubtedly save the rout and enabled two Infantry Battalions, who had been off near CUGNY, to get back to our lines.

At GUY, he organised the rear lines of defence, covering the retirement of the 2nd and 3rd Cavalry Divisions, and enabled the men and horses to withdraw safely. He commanded the Brigade Party, in the attack on BOIS-DES-ESSARTS.

Bar to DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
LCol Herbert Irving Stevenson DSO
He led his regiment with great gallantry and determination during the advance from Mametz to Le Coteau on October 9th, 1918. He directed the operations from most advanced positions under heavy shell and machine gun fire and showed a total disregard for all danger. The capture of the Bois de Gatitgny was entirely due to this officer’s initiative, fine leading, and had a most important bearing on the subsequent advance. His conduct throughout the operations was splendid, and he set an inspiring example to his regiment.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Thomas Cuthbert Anderson
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while in charge of a small patrol detailed to locate crossings over a river for cavalry and tanks. He pushed on in front of the infantry, found a suitable crossing, and then acted as guide to the tanks. Owing to his bold, determined work the brigade was enabled to cross the river and launch its attack before the infantry had reached its second objective, thus contributing largely to the success of the cavalry action. ( London Gazette – 15 October 1918)

On 8 August 1918, Lt Anderson was in command of a patrol in the Rive Valley near HANGEST with instructions to report as rapidly as possible on all crossing between Demmin and Carx. He discovered two crossings at IGNEAUCOURT both possible for cavalry and one for Whippet Tanks thus enabling the Brigade to press forward at once.

During the operations of 23 to 27 March 1918, Lt Anderson commanded a troop of the FGH in the attack on enemy positions at VILLESELVE and led his troop with great gallantry, and held his position against heavy odds until ordered to retire. During the whole operation, while in action and on patrol, he showed the greatest courage and determination. (Honourable mention in War Diary)

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Frederick Gibson Butterfield
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of a patrol. Although severely wounded by one of an enemy patrol whom he had pursued and captured single-handed, he continued at the head of his patrol until he collapsed, setting a magnificent example of pluck and determination to his men. (17 September 1917)

On the evening of 18 June 1917, while in command of the right section of a patrol searching ASCENSION WOOD, led his men with great courage and determination. As enemy patrol was met, Lt Butterfield rushed ahead and single handed, encountered a German taking him prisoner. During the struggle Lt Butterfield received a bayonet wound through the body. Although badly wounded, he continued at the head of his patrol until he collapsed. By his conspicuous bravery, courage and determination in the face of the enemy, he set a splendid example to his men.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. John Butterfield
For conspicuous gallantry in action. He led the advance guard of his squadron and skilfully negotiated trench crossings through wire in a very difficult country under heavy fire. By his coolness and good leadership he set a fine example to his men, whose numbers had been greatly reduced, until he was subsequently wounded. (London Gazette – 15 October 1918)

On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, Lt Butterfield led the advance guard of his Squadron and skilfully negotiated trench crossings through wire in a very difficult country under heavy fire. This officer carried on until wounded and gave his men a splendid lead after his numbers had been greatly reduced.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Duncan Campbell
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack of four lines of enemy defences. He was in command of the leading squadron, and seeing that the leading troops had lost direction owing to their leader and sergeant being wounded, he went forward and rallied them to their objective. This prompt action enabled many dugouts to be cleared, a number of prisoners to be captured, and very largely contributed to the success of the whole operation. (This action took place on 8/9 July 1917) (Awarded 10 July 1917) (London Gazette 17 September 1917)

MILITARY CROSS
Capt. Howard Alfred Lorne Conn
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty’s Birthday. No citation. (4 June 1917)

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. William Joseph Cowen
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as second in command of his squadron, which charged an enemy battery two miles in rear of their line. Though badly wounded he led his men on and brought back six prisoners. (Cambrai, 20 Nov 1917.)

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. George Wilfrid Duggan
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Prior to operations against four lines of enemy defences he made daring and successful reconnaissances on four successive nights right up to the enemy’s wire. By this he eventually enabled to lead a torpedo party into the enemy’s front line, and also displayed great skill and success in commanding a party which blocked an enemy counter-attack. (This action took place on 8/9 July 1917) (Awarded 10 July 1917) (London Gazette 17 September 1917)

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Edward William Fleming
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was in command of the leading troop of his squadron, which galloped through the enemy’s lines and silenced a battery by cutting down all the gun crew. (Cambrai, 20 Nov 1917.)

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Ronald Frank Haig
On the 9th October, 1918, near Le Coteau, C Squadron was ordered to outflank Reumont with the object of cutting of the retiring enemy. With great dash he led his troop and charged a number of the enemy with a sword, killing several and capturing six machine-guns and 42 prisoners. Later, when his squadron leader became a casualty, he took command and seized the high ground north of Reumont and held it until relieved. Throughout he showed marked courage and able leadership.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Donald Frederick Hardwick
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In the attack he led the advance squadron of his regiment, and although seriously wounded, he, by his personal courage and disregard of danger, ensured the continuance of the advance, in which many prisoners and three machine guns were captured. His gallantry and fearlessness contributed in a special degree to the success of the operation. (London Gazette – 22 June 1918)

Lt Hardwick lead A Squadron FGH Party which was the first to enter RIFLE WOOD, in the attack of April 1, 1918. He pushed forward with such dash and determination that he cut off a large number of the enemy, who came out of the WOOD and surrendered. He showed splendid courage and it was largely owing to this work that the casualties of the other following parties were so small. This officer was seriously wounded during this operation.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Ernest McIntyre Holiday
He was in command of a raiding party of 2 officers and 18 men extern look on the left sector of the attack and between a flank ground between the enemy and the party which attacked MAX WOOD. His party later joined Lt Strachan’s party and co-operated on the attack on DOGS LEG. This party captured 3 prisoners and killed at least 4 of the enemy. This officer has since been seriously wounded (May 26, 1917) (This may not be the occasion for his MC)

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Roger Graham Hutchison
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in command of the first wave of the attack, he showed great courage and dash in the handling of his party, and pushed his men on in advance of another brigade party, thus enabling many prisoners to be captured and saving many casualties which would otherwise have been incurred. Later, he organised the defences of the left portion of the wood under heavy shellfire, and successfully repulsed several hostile counter-attacks. He showed a splendid example to all under him. (London Gazette – 22 June 1918)

A/Capt Hutchison was in command of the FGH Party of 175 OR’s which was the first wave in the attack on RIFLE WITH showed great dash and courage in the handling of his party, and pushed them into the WOOD in advance of the 5th Brigade Party, which was at first ahead of them, thus enabling the capture of many prisoners, and saving many casualties which would have been incurred in the open. Later he organised the defences of the left portion of the wood under heavy shellfire, and withstood several enemy counter attacks successfully. He showed a splendid example to all under him.

MILITARY CROSS
Capt. George Irving
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty’s Birthday. No citation. (3 June 1918)

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Thomas John MM
On October 9th, 1918, the squadron had orders to attack the Bois-de-Mont Aux-Villes, held strongly by the enemy with machine guns. This officer had orders to gallop round the east side of the wood and cut off the enemy. This action he accomplished very successfully, and later, charging the enemy three times with the sword, captured and killed ninety and took eleven machine guns. Throughout he showed conspicuous gallantry, initiative and ability to command.

MILITARY CROSS
Capt. Stanley Alfred Lee
Awarded on the occasion of His Majesty’s Birthday. No citation. (3 June 1918)

MILITARY CROSS
Capt Benjamin Lyon (C.A.M.C. – Attached to FGH)
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, after the charge by troops of “A” and “C” Squadrons, FGH up the ROYE-AMIENS Road, Capt Lyon followed on foot and attended and evacuated the wounded under heavy enemy artillery and machine gun fire in exceptionally dangerous circumstances, remaining there until all the wounded were brought out.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Richard Burkett Mills
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He penetrated through the enemy’s advanced lines with the utmost skill and fearlessness, and advanced to their main position, sending back information of the greatest value. During the withdrawal three days later he showed great courage and ability in holding together the left flank and withdrawing his men in safety, through the enemy had already penetrated some distance in rear of this flank. (1 April 1918) ( London Gazette – 22 June 1918)

Acting as adjutant of the Canadian Brigade Party of 476 men who captured RIFLE WOOD on April 1, 1918, Lt Mills showed great courage and determination and was an important factor in the success of the operation. In order to speed up the advance over the approach to the WOOD, he pushed on reached the entrance to the WOOD, ahead of the attacking party, although constantly under heavy MG and shellfire. During the operation, he was sent to different parts of the fight, in various capacity, and was of valuable assistance in forming the continuous defence line around the WOOD. (Honourable mention in War Diary)

He commanded a Patrol through the enemy lines N of VILLESELVE, locating their main positions with great courage and persistence. In the retirement from the Chateau de ESSART, with great courage he advanced and collected the left flank, retiring them when the enemy was some distance in re rear of his left flank

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Arthur Thomas Newby
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his troop with great dash and courage under heavy artillery fire against a position strongly held by machine guns, being wounded in doing so. He set a splendid example to those under his command. (2 December 1918)

MILITARY CROSS
SQMS Charles Johnstone Pollexfen 
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during a raid against four lines of enemy defences. At a moment when his troops were disorganised by heavy enemy rifle and grenade fire, he rallied them with great coolness and presence of mind, and charged the enemy, killing four and driving the remainder into our artillery barrage. He killed one of them himself, and by his splendid personal example and exceptional gallantry inspired his men with confidence at a critical moment, and restored the situation, enabling them to gain their objective. (8/9/July 1917) (Awarded 10 July 1917) (London Gazette 5 July 1918)

MILITARY CROSS
Lt Claude Ernest Stevens
On October 9th, 1918, in command of the advanced troop of his squadron, he had orders to advance and locate the enemy’s position. He found the enemy holding the Bois-de-Montaux-Villes and Boix-de-Cattigny. This information he sent back, and then attacked the wood with his troop, charging with the sword, accounting for seventy odd prisoners and killing a number of the enemy. Throughout the day and following night he showed fine courage and leadership.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt. Harcus Strachan
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He commanded a party which attacked the enemy’s outposts. He handled his men with great ability and dash, capturing eight prisoners and killing many more. The operation was carried out without a single casualty to the party. ( London Gazette 16 August 1917.)

On 26 May 1917, he commanded a raiding party of 2 officers and 38 men in an attack on MAX WOOD, DOGS LEG, and sunken road in G32.d.10.1 It was owing to his careful preparation and determined execution of his plans for the action that the raid proved successful without any casualties to his party. He showed exceptional courage in action. (Recommended by LCol Paterson May 27, 1917 – Awarded 9 June 1917)

MILITARY CROSS
Capt. Joseph Benjamin Stratford
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Although greatly outnumbered, he continued to attack, and by sheer courage and determination succeeded in driving the enemy out of the southern portion of the wood. He then consolidated the position, which he succeeded in maintaining, thus enabling our line to be re-established. His courage and skill were most conspicuous throughout. (London Gazette 22 June 1918)

He commanded the Fort Garry Horse Squadron, in the attack on BOIS-DES-ESSARTS, while he was heavily outnumbered, he drove the enemy out of this section of the WOOD, with great dash, and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy, and successfully consolidated the position. He also, while commanding this Squadron, assisted in covering the retirement of the 2nd and 3rd Divisions, with great courage and gallantry.

MILITARY CROSS
Capt. Ernest Coulter Whitehouse (C.A.M.C. Attached to FGH)
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He attended the wounded under heavy fire, going out repeatedly to bring in wounded officers and men. (Supplement to London Gazette 25 April 1918)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
LCpl Charles Hedley Atcherley
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in charge of torpedo party. During an attack upon four lines of enemy defences, he pushed forward into our barrage and destroyed the enemy’s wire, took his party through the gap and established a block in the enemy trench to prevent counter-attack. His prompt and gallant action ensured a rapid passage of our main body into the enemy’s trench, and undoubtedly saved many casualties, as the enemy’s barrage opened on the wire immediately after our attacking party had entered the trench. ( 8/9 July 1917) (Awarded 10 July 1917) (London Gazette 17 September 1917)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Pte. Edward Blake Balfour (later Lt.)
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. This NCO had located an enemy field gun about 600 yards away from some positions that had been captured. He advanced about 60 yards into the open, under heavy fire of all descriptions, and engaged the enemy gun with such success that the serving detachment dispersed precipitately, leaving the gun after two of their number has been seen to fall. He maintained his position for three hours under heavy fire and prevented the enemy returning to their gun. ASgt Balfour’s courageous action and initiative contributed in a marked degree to our retention of the captured position. (London Gazette – 3 September 1918)

Was No 1 of the Hotchkiss Team, on March 23, 1918, at VILLEQUIER -AUMONT, Sgt Balfour handled his gun with great skill and daring, covering the retirement of his troops, until the enemy were within 50 yards. He then retired about 100 yards and again brought his gun into action, holding the enemy and enabling his troop to take up a new position. His action saved many casualties and caused heavy losses to the enemy. On April 1, 1918, at RIFLE WOOD, after the WOOD had been cleared, the enemy opened a severe artillery fire and MG fire on our position in the edge of the WOOD, Sgt Balfour, located an enemy gun on the road near point 104, advanced about 60 yards into the open, over a ploughed field and engaged the enemy position with his Hotchkiss. Two of the gun crew were seen to fall and the remainder bolted, leaving their gun. He maintained his position under heavy fire for nearly three hours, and prevented the enemy from getting to their Gun, thus saving many casualties.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Sgt. James A. Bernas
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as one of a squadron that galloped through the enemy lines. When his horse was shot, he collected all other dismounted men and defended his position against attacks from all sides until after dark, when his squadron joined him and brought his party back. (Cambrai, 20 Nov 1917.)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Cpl James George Crouch
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in charge of four bombers. He attacked and silenced an enemy machine gun which was firing at close range, and afterwards attacking and inflicting heavy casualties upon a large party of the enemy, killing six, capturing twenty-two, and driving the remainder into our barrage. He then rejoined and reorganised his troop, which was without a leader, and took command, bombing sixteen dugouts and displaying magnificent fearlessness and determination throughout. (8/9 July 1917) (Awarded 10 July 1917) (London Gazette 17 September 1917)

During the raid on enemy’s position on night 8/9 July 1917, he showed great coolness and daring when leading the bombers in the attack. With four men , he captured 22 of the enemy and killed a great many more in bombing dug outs and positions. When his officer and sergeant became casualties, he took charge of the troop and after completion of his work rallied his men and led them out of the enemy lines. His work contributed largely to the success of the operation.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Pte. James Moore Dunwoody (later Lt.)
For conspicuous good work when reconnoitring the enemy’s trenches. (11 March 1916)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
LCpl Andrew Fraser MM
On 9th October, 1918, near Clury, he was in charge of a section when the squadron charged the Bois-du-Mont-aux-Villes Wood. He led his section against a machine-gun nest, and succeeded in capturing four machine-guns and crews. He showed great courage and leadership until he was severely wounded during the afternoon fighting (London Gazette – 10 Jan 1920)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Pte. William Charles Gawley
For most conspicuous gallantry and cool determination in action. His horse having been killed, he immediately attacked on foot an enemy machine-gun detachment, capturing the complete crew of four men and the gun, and bringing the complete detachment back to his lines under heavy fire. His performance was splendid. (London Gazette – 30 October 1918)

On 10 August, 1918, in action West of ROYE, Pte Gawley, his horse having been killed, immediately attacked on foot and enemy machine gun detachment, capturing the complete crew of four men and the gun, and bringing the complete detachment into our line under heavy fire.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Sgt. James Willis Johnson
For conspicuous gallantry and enterprise. After his squadron had taken a village he located an enemy machine gun in the church, which was causing casualties to the squadron. With a small patrol he attacked the position, and by his courage and good leadership succeeded in capturing eleven prisoners and the gun. (London Gazette – 30 October 1918)

On 8 August 1918, after the Squadron had seized the village of BEAUCOURT, Sgt Johnson located a party of enemy with machine guns in the church who were causing casualties to the Squadron. This NCO with a picked patrol attacked enemy’s position and by clear and courageous action, succeeded in capturing 11 prisoners and one machine gun.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Pte. William Jolley
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In the attack he was one of the first to enter a wood and he personally killed two of the enemy, assisting in the capture of a number of others. Later, during intense shell and machine-gun fire he carried six wounded men to places of safety, and was in the act of carrying away a seventh when he was himself wounded in both legs. His gallant conduct was the means of saving the lives of many of his comrades. (London Gazette – 26 June 1918)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
LCpl David B. Jones
For conspicuous gallantry when repairing telephone wire under fire, and for general good work. (11 March 1916)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Cpl. Charles Reuben Keen MM
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in leading a torpedo party under heavy hostile fire of every description, and clearing a way through two line of enemy wire. He afterwards took his party through the gap and established a block, successfully preventing any attempt at counter-attack by the enemy, and he held this block, with his two men, until all three were wounded, having displayed exceptional courage and initiative. (London Gazette – 17 September 1917)

During the night 8/9 July 1917, Sgt Keene was part of a party that exploded two bangalore torpedoes on enemy wire and formed an opening through which raiding party passed. The second torpedo was placed under heavy shell and machine gun fire from the enemy and although five of the party were wounded, the torpedoes were successfully exploded and the wire cut. This operation was essential in the success of the enterprise (Awarded 10 July 1917)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Pte. James Lyle Lawrence
On October 9th, 1918, when the right troop charged at Bois-du-Mont-aux-Villes, they were fired on by an enemy machine-gun. This man at once ordered his section to follow him and charged the machine-gun, killing two enemy and capturing six, also the gun. He showed conspicuous gallantry and initiative.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Pte. William Albert Morrall
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as one of a squadron that galloped through the enemy’s lines in volunteering to carry a message back after the squadron was cut off. His horse was shot, but he succeeded in delivering the message on foot. He then volunteered to take a message back, and again had his horse shot, and while endeavouring to proceed on foot was himself wounded. (Cambrai, 20 Nov 1917.)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Sgt. Alister McAllister
On October 9th and the night of 9th/10th, 1918, about Maurois, he was commanding a troop in support during the attack on the Bois-du-Mont-aux-Villes Wood. He handled his troop splendidly, and on his own initiative charged a party of the enemy, cutting them off and capturing eleven prisoners and two machine guns.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Sgt John MacDonald
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was the leading man of a party which attacked the enemy outposts. He led the party with great coolness and gallantry, killing three of the enemy and compelling the surrender of the others. His splendid example contributed largely to the success of the enterprise. (16 August 1917)

For extreme coolness and determination in action while leading the advanced guard of a raiding party attacking MAX WOOD, DOG’S LEG WOOD and Sunken Road. This NCO killed several of the enemy in hand to hand encounters, and capturing others.(26 May 1917) (Awarded 31 May 1917)

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Cpl. Richard Nelson
On 9th October, 1918, after his squadron had charged the Bois de Cattigny, he saw a number of the enemy on his left trying to get a machine gun into action. He promptly called to three of his companions and charged this party, killing some and capturing the remainder and the gun.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
LCpl George Watson O’Reilly
On August 10, 1918, he made a most daring reconnaissance under heavy shellfire in the vicinity of Damery and brought back valuable information. He again went into action with the charge on Z Wood. During the charge his horse was shot from under him. Not being able to continue, he returned over open country swept by heavy machine gun fire to obtain stretchers for the wounded. He went back with them and rendered great assistance while under heavy fire. This man has shown great gallantry and devotion to duty at all time.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
LCpl Percy Charles Read
For conspicuous gallantry and initiative. On October 7th, 1918, when charging with his troops on the woods at Bois de Cattigny he had his horse shot under him. Observing two enemy machine guns still firing on an infantry regiment coming up, Pte Read volunteered to direct an officer and his company on these guns. The movement was carried out with great success.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
SQMS Thomas Standing
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in a charge. When his squadron leader was injured he greatly assisted in rallying parts of the troops who got mixed up in wire entanglements. When both troop leaders were put out of action he took command of the remainder of the troops and held the position until relieved by the infantry. He set a splendid example to his men of determination and cool courage. (London Gazette – 30 October 1918)

On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, SSM Standing took part in a charge with two troops of “C” Squadron and when the Squadron Commander was injured, he greatly assisted in rallying part of the troop who got mixed up in wire entanglement. When both troop leaders had been put out of action – one killed, the other missing and supposed to be killed – he took command of the remainder of the two troops and held the position until relieved by the Infantry.

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL
Sgt. William Willis
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was in command of a squadron in the attack on a wood, and led the charge on two enemy machine guns. Though wounded, he continued to lead his men, and, having reached his objective, was organizing the defence of the position when he was again seriously wounded. His courage, determination and skilful leadership contributed greatly to the success of the operation. (London Gazette – 26 June 1918)

MILITARY MEDAL
SSgt. John James Adams
During the raid on the enemy’s trenches on the night of 8/9 July 1917, he was in charge of the bayoneting party. He discovered the Germans in a small dugout. One of these attacked and wounded him with a bayonet. Single handed, he killed the man who attacked him and captured the other two. This displayed great coolness and conspicuous bravery. (Awarded 10 July 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. John Gibson Anderson
Pte Anderson was acting as regimental dispatch rider during the operations of 9 October 1918, night of 9/10 October. He repeatedly carried messages and made journeys under heavy shell and machine gun fire thereby keeping the squadron commanders in touch, at all times, with the movement of their flanks. During the whole of this time, he showed great devotion to duty.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt. Auguste Belliveau
On the 10 August in action West of ROYE, 3 Troop, “A” Squadron was detailed as advance guard to the Squadron and had to patrol an area swept with machine gun fire and shell fire. Sgt Belliveau gallantly led the “points” and by his fearless and determined endeavour reached a point in a sunken road which afforded good cover for the Squadron. Later, when our mounted advance was held up by wire, he took a patrol and reconnoitred the trenches and wire ahead of our position and also gained touch with patrols right and left. His courage and cool behaviour was a splendid example to others.

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. George Richard Bond
Pte Bond showed great devotion to duty as a first aid man. He not only took part in all the mounted actions with his squadron but remained behind, cleared all casualties of his own and other units and also carried on the same work throughout the night 9/10 October 1918.

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. Robert Bradshaw
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, Pte Bradshaw took part in a charge against the enemy position at Hill 100 on the AMIENS-ROYE Road. After the charge, he continued to look after the wounded and helped to carry them out under heavy fire. He showed conspicuous courage and coolness throughout the action.

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. Jacob Horace Brownell
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE in a charge against the enemy position at Hill 100 on the ROYE-AMIENS Road, although injured in the charge, Pte Brownell continued to assist in the care of wounded, showed great courage and daring throughout the operation.

MILITARY MEDAL
LCpl Ernest Chivers
Was in charge of his Hotchkiss Gun Section near FRIERES WOOD on March 24th, 1918, when the Troops on his left had been forced to retire, he held his position and kept his gun in action. With the enemy within thirty yards he changed the barrel of his gun (which had become nearly red hot) and again opened fire checking the advancing enemy and thus enabling a squadron on his right (which would otherwise have been surrounded) to withdraw. He retained his position until ordered to withdraw. His determined stand doubtless saved many casualties.

In the subsequent actions at MOREUIL WOOD and RIFLE WOOD this N.C.O. showed splendid courage and initiative and in the latter was seriously wounded losing the sight of one eye.

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl Ronald Comber
Cpl Comber took part in the charge against the enemy on 9 October 1918, and showed great initiative in handling his troop throughout the operations. During the night 9/10 October, he was in charge of left flank patrol, pushing forward into enemy’s territory also keeping the units on his flanks continually advised of the enemy movements.

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl William Albert Cook

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt. Frederick Hamilton Cram
On May 26, 1917, Sgt Cram was in charge of the left flank guard in the attack on the enemy’s outpost. He led his men with conspicuous skill and courage, killing some of the enemy and compelling the surrender of others. (Awarded 3 June 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. Claude Ernest Davies
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, Pte Davies was conspicuous for coolness and courage and was a splendid example to his comrades in exceptionally difficult circumstances.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt. Lewis William Dawes

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt. Harry Deakin

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. Harold James Dent

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Otto Albert Dunning
Pte Dunning was in the bombing party on the raid on the night of 8/9 July 1917. During the operation a party of about 30 of the enemy attempted to escape our raiding party. Pte Dunning charged the party, shot one, and bayoneted another and so succeeded in cutting of the retreat of 22 of the party. (Awarded 10 July 1917)

During the raid on the enemy trenches on the night 8/9 July 1917, this man was a member of the bombing party. He, with four others, charged a party of 40 of the enemy and single handed he shot one, bayoneted a second and killed a third with the butt of his rifle. His great courage, coolness and determination enabled his party to cut off and capture 22 of the enemy. During the remainder of the operation his valour was a splendid example to the remainder of his party.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Albert L. Farman
On 25 March 1917, this NCO went forward in face of heavy rifle fire and brought in a wounded man from a shell hole 100 yards in front of the enemy’s position. (Awarded 9 April 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. Francis Fitzgerald
During the night 8/9 July 1917, Pte Fitzgerald was part of a party that exploded two bangalore torpedoes on enemy wire and formed an opening through which raiding parties passed. The second torpedo was placed under heavy shell and machine gun fire from the enemy and although five of the party were wounded, the torpedoes were successfully exploded and the wire cut. This operation was essential in the success of the enterprise. (Awarded 10 July 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt. John Alfred Frankish

MILITARY MEDAL
LCpl Andrew Fraser
On September 3rd/4th 1917. As a leading bomber he displayed the utmost courage and initiative, his section carrying out the work allotted to them in a most dashing manner. After all objectives had been reached and the Companies making the attack had consolidated their position, Pte. Fraser advanced to the German position in front of his own and under heavy machine gun fire brought in a wounded comrade.

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. Edward Garlick
During the night 8/9 July 1917, Pte Garlick was part of a party that exploded two bangalore torpedoes on enemy wire and formed an opening through which raiding parties passed. The second torpedo was placed under heavy shell and machine gun fire from the enemy and although five of the party were wounded, the torpedoes were successfully exploded ands the wire cut. This operation was essential in the success of the enterprise. (Awarded 10 July 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. George Gibbons

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. William Hall

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl Edward Hodgkinson
During the night of 9/10 October, 1918, Cpl Hodgkinson showed great devotion to duty at LE CATEAU in carrying out reconnaissance as a patrol leader.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt William Innes
While in charge of a troop on 25 March 1917, he pushed through the village of YTRES under heavy rifle fire, and succeeded in holding his position while the village was cleared. (Awarded 9 April 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Charles Morton Johnstone
On the 10th August, 1918, in action W of ROYE, Sgt Johnstone took part in a charge against the enemy position at Point 100. He afterwards returned several times with wounded under heavy enemy artillery fire and MG fire. During the whole operation, he showed utter disregard for his personal safety ands was a splendid example to his men.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Charles Reuben Keene DCM
In the actions of “B” Squadron on 9 October 1918, and night of 9/10 October, all the officers except the Squadron Commander having become casualties, Sgt Keene carried on second-in-command and on a temporary recall of the Squadron Commander from the advanced position at LE CATEAU; this NCO took charge of the Squadron. Throughout the whole operations, he showed great courage and devotion to duty.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt William Stanley King

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. Frank Lane

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte. Robert Lawrence
On 9 October 1918, Pte Lawrence was in the charge with his troop on BOIS-DU-MONT-AUX-VILLES WOOD. After killing several of the enemy with his sword and his section leader having become a casualty, this man commanded the section capturing two machine guns and 12 prisoners. Throughout, this man showed great courage and devotion to duty.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt. Steven Oldacres Lawson
On 9 October 1918, in the attack on BOIS-DU- MONT-AUX-VILLE WOOD, Sgt Lawson showed great courage killing several of the enemy, also capturing 17 prisoners with a small patrol which he rallied after the charge. Throughout, this NCO showed splendid courage and devotion to duty.

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl Herbert Cameron Lewis
On 8 August 1918, after the Squadron had seized the village of BEAUCOURT, while in charge of a patrol, Cpl Lewis was fired on from the Chateau. He immediately attacked the enemy from the seat killing and wounding a number and capturing five prisoners without having any casualties to his patrol.

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl Norman Fletcher Lindsay

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl James Lucas

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Kenneth Ferguson MacDonald
On the night 26/27 May 1917, Pte MacDonald was attacked by 2 of the enemy; he killed one and captured the other. His courageous action enabled the attack to continue. (Awarded 3 June 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Sydney Dudley Markham
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, Pte Markham took part in a charge against the enemy position at Point 100. He showed exceptional bravery and fearlessness and at all times was a conspicuous example to the others of his troop.

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl Cecil H. Mayo
Throughout the day of 9 October 1918, and night of 9/10 October, Cpl Mayo was in charge of patrols. On each occasion, he did excellent work and sent in accurate information. During the night, he was in charge of right flank patrol and when he was unable, in the darkness, to find any unit on his flank with which to connect, he remained out with his patrol as a protection to the Regiment until relieved at daybreak.

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Kenneth Gerald McDonald

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt John McKay
During the night of 8/9 July 1917, Sgt McKay was in charged of a bombing party of three which silenced an enemy machine gun and also did exceptionally good work in bombing enemy trenches and dug outs. (Awarded 10 July 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl Herford Winslow McKinnon

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl A.J. McLelland
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, he was conspicuous for gallantry and devotion to duty during the recent cavalry operations. Cpl McLelland volunteered for and took charge of a dismounted patrol. He showed utter disregard of danger and wonderful initiative in carrying out important reconnaissance in front of our position under artillery and machine gun fire. He took part in a charge against the enemy on the point Hill 100 on the ROYE-AMIENS Road.

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl John Mewes
During the night 8/9 July 1917, although seriously wounded in the face by a bayonet at the beginning of the operation, he continued to lead his section with great coolness and determination and succeeded in clearing a large portion of the enemy position. (Awarded 10 July 1917)

During the raid on the enemy’s trenches on the night of 8/9 July he was a member of the party which attacked “C” trench. Though this NCO was wounded in the face at the beginning of the operation, he continued to lead his section with great dash and coolness. Single handed, he killed a German, and his party skilfully bombed the dugouts and cleared the trench of the enemy. This action was a sterling example of conspicuous bravery.

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte George Meacham Milligan
On 10 August 1918, in action W of ROYE, as one of the points of the advance guard, Pte Milligan selected trench crossings and gaps in wire under heavy fire which enabled the advance guard to proceed with all possible speed. When all the horses were killed, his courageous resourcefulness was an example for all ranks.

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl William Thomas Mills
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, Cpl Mills was invaluable throughout the action and by his cool and daring behaviour was an inspiring example to all ranks.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Lawrence Richard H. Nash
On the night of May 26/27, 1917, Sgt Nash displayed conspicuous bravery. He forced 3 enemy in a rifle pit. He killed one of these and captured the other two. (Awarded 3 June 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Ivery Newton
On 9 October 1918, in the attack on BOIS-DU-MONT-AUX-VILLES WOOD, Pte Newton was in charge of a section which did splendid work. After the first charge, when many of the enemy had been killed with the sword, this man rallied his section together and charged a Machine Gun, capturing them together with their crews.

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Bruce Hare Roberts

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl William James Slater

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Carson Arthur Cecil Smith

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Thomas Henry Stevens
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, Pte Stevens was dispatch rider for Regimental Headquarters and after troops of “A” and “C” Squadrons had charged and were unable to proceed with and were fighting dismounted, he proceeded twice on foot over difficult country under heavy enemy artillery and machine gun fire with messages to the dismounted troops in front. During the whole operation, he cheerfully undertook several difficult missions including a journey to “B” Squadron who were in front of “A” and “C” Squadrons.

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Alfred Thomas Stone
Private Stone showed great daring and courage when his squadron took part in the operation on 9 October 1918. After a charge against the enemy, the squadron was forced to retire owing to the intense artillery and machine gun fire. Pte Stone remained behind with a wounded man, dressed his wounds and with great coolness carried him out of danger. His gallantry throughout was a fine example to all ranks.

MILITARY MEDAL
LCpl Vinton Tillotson

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Edward Tipton
On the night 8/9 July 1917 during a raid on the enemy trenches, he was in charge of advanced signallers station. He kept his station going in spite of heavy shelling and machine gun fire and kept Regimental Headquarters informed at all times of the progress of the operation. His work has been special for which on former occasions I have honour to submit this recommendation for conspicuous courage and devotion to duty. (Awarded 10 July 1917)

During the raid on the enemy trenches on the night of 8/9 July 1917, this NCO was in charge of the advanced signal station with the raiding party. He laid telephone wire from our lines to the enemy’s front trench, a distance of 1500 yards and there under heavy enemy artillery, machine gun and rifle fire, he established a telephone station throughout the whole operation he maintained direct communication with his Regimental Headquarters and kept his Commanding Officer advised as to the progress of the operations. This NCO displayed conspicuous coolness and courage under very trying conditions. On a previous operation this NCO showed conspicuous bravery and determination for which he was recommended for reward by his CO.

Sgt Tipton showed exceptional devotion to duty while in the forward area between the date of May 14th and June 3rd, 1917. He was in SOMERVILLE WOOD for six days and during that period set a very good example to his comrades while under heavy shell and machine gun fire. He was cheerful and always ready to lend a helping hand at what ever turned up at the same time carrying out his duties at the telephone he was in charge of the signallers at the advanced posts. (Recommended by Maj Bingham 7 June 1917)

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Jean Edward Clement Van Wilderode

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Robert Wesley Walker

MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Frederick Wilcox
During the night 8/9/July 1917, Pte Wilcox was part of a party that exploded two bangalore torpedoes on enemy wire and formed an opening through which raiding parties passed. The second torpedo was placed under heavy shell and machine gun fire from the enemy and although five of the party were wounded, the torpedoes were successfully exploded and the wire cut. This operation was essential to the success of the enterprise. (Awarded 10 July 1917)

Bar to MILITARY MEDAL
Pte Francis Fitzgerald

Bar to MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl Charles Morton Johnson MM
After a charge on 9 October, 1918, two of the officers of his Squadron were left dismounted, their horses having become casualties. The Squadron, being forced to retire owing to intense Machine Gun and Artillery fire, Sgt Johnson took a message from the Squadron Commander to Regimental Headquarters in the face of this fire, also returning through it with fresh mounts for the Officers. During the whole of the operation of the day and night 9/10 October, this NCO rendered his squadron officers valuable assistance and materially helped towards the success of this Squadron’s operations, besides setting a fine example to those under him.

Bar to MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt John McKay

MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL
SSM Leonard R Barrell

MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL
Sgt. John Stevens Burns

MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL
A/Sgt. John Cook

MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL
FQMS Harry Louden

MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL
RSM Harold Shath Square

MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL
Sgt. William Willis

MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES
Pte Alfred Ernest Ashton

Lt George Henry Ritson Bennett

Maj Robert Francis Bingham

Capt David Young Black

Lt James Moore Dunwoody

Cpl John E Holmes (CCB Signal Troop)

Capt George Irving

LCpl David B Jones

Lt Thomas Lanceley
On 10 August 1918, in action West of ROYE, Lt Lanceley was in charge of the supporting troop to the advance guard of “B” Squadron and on the officer commanding the Advance Guard being wounded, he collected the survivors of both parties and passed through the village of ANDECHY, encountering two enemy Machine Guns, which he put out of action, capturing one. This officer displayed great courage and resources during the afternoon.

RQMS William Laughland

Sgt Alex Logan
Sgt Logan is recommended for devotion to duty and good work in the field. He has been in action with his squadron on several occasions and set a splendid example of coolness in looking after the shoeing of the horses and attending to wounded horses. He has, on more than one occasion, continually worked 24 hours without rest looking after the welfare of his horses. His good work and devotion to duty with the Regiment covers a period of over 2 1/2 years in the field.

Maj Edward Liddell Middlemast
On 8 August 1918, Major Middlemast’s squadron attacked and occupied the village of BEAUCOURT; he led the squadron with great skill and daring and mopped up the enemy Machine Guns and snipers; this great action allowed for further advance. He set a splendid example and showed great courage and devotion.

LCol Robert Walter Paterson

SSM Charles Johnston Pollexfen

Pte Bruce Hare Roberts

Capt Wallace James Sharpe

LCol Herbert Irving Stevenson DSO

NAMES BROUGHT TO NOTICE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR WAR FOR VALUABLE SERVICES

Maj JT Bardolph*

LCol RA Carman*

Sgt LM Frederick*

Maj RA March*

Cpl Robert H Mellis

RSM CC McBride* (2)

LCol Duncan Gordon MacPherson

Sgt John Robert Peacock

Pte William W Pentland

Maj AMS Ross*

Maj RF Stockwell*

Lt Cecil John Sutton

SSGT Percy J Tytherleigh

Maj Graham Anderson Watson

Hon LCol George A Wells (2)

CROIX DE GUERRE (FRENCH)
BGen Robert Walter Patterson CMG DSO
The General Commanding the 5th French Army Corps, Gen Pelli, mentions through the Army Corps: The group of Cavalry under command of Gen Pitman, composed of units belonging to different British and Canadian Cavalry Corps: has taken on the 26th of March 1918, the BOIS DES ESSARTS after a brilliant attack under particularly severe conditions; has, also by vigorous counter attacks, mounted and dismounted, contributed to stop the advance of the enemy superior in number, and to ensure the liaison between the two Divisions next to him; and by its noble attitude and spirit of self sacrifice, has raised the enthusiasm of the troops fighting in the neighbourhood.

Amongst the Units composing the group and having distinguished themselves, the General Commanding the 5th Army Corps mentions: 3rd Cavalry Division Detachment, GHQ, 2nd May 1918, LCOL RW Paterson DSO, Fort Garry Horse

Maj AMS Ross*

Capt Wallace James Sharpe DSO
Awarded by French Military Authorities in recognition of the officer’s services during the action 24 March 1917, to 29 March, 1917. (Awarded 28 May 1917)

LCol Herbert Irving Stevenson DSO

HONOURABLE MENTION IN WAR DIARY

Cpl George Alfred Beane
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Sgt Russell W Carr
During the operation of the 23rd to 27th March 1918, Sgt Carr was Senior NCO of the FGH Squadron. By his courage and determination in many instances, he inspired the men to acts of splendid gallantry. In the attack on the BOIS DES ESSART, he led his men with great judgement and gallantry, and contributed largely to the success of the attack.

Pte Ernest William Cherrington
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Pte George Wilbur Dobson
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Pte AH Emery (*? 115021)
Acting as dispatch rider and guide, in the attack on BOIS DE MOREUIL, on March 30th, 1918, Pte Emery showed great courage and devotion to duty, continually proceeding from Regimental Headquarters to the different positions in front of the WOODS, under the heaviest of shell fire. Later he led the relieving parties into the front line positions, all of which were under heavy fire.

Cpl Robert Green
Acted as guide and carried information, in the operation on BOIS DE MOREUIL, Cpl Green constantly travelled backward and forward through the WOOD, in which were a number of enemy, and which was being heavily shelled. He enabled touch to be kept with the various parties and led reinforcements to the points where they were most needed.

Sgt Thomas Harrison
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Pte Frank Clarence Hitchcock
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Cpl Cuthbert King Matthews
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Pte Cecil H Mayo MM
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Sgt James Rhodes Reeve
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Cpl John Thomas Scott
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

Cpl George Bernard Smith
(Actions 23 March – 1 April 1918)

The Second World War 1939-1945

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
Maj William Roy BrayArmour awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 19 August 1944 and CARO/4819 dated 26 August 1944.
This officer commanded the right squadron of special assault tanks, and was among the first troops to land in the area of ST AUBIN-SUR-MER. He got his squadron ashore against a very heavy sea and in the face of strong enemy fire. On landing he found that enemy minefields were holding up the advance which would congest the beach area and prejudice the success of the operation. He immediately led his squadron across the minefield and at the cost of three tanks was able to restore the situation and support the infantry into ST AUBIN-SUR-MER. With outstanding skill and personal courage he controlled the fire and movement of his troops in such a manner as to best support the assault infantry onto their objective. He did this successfully despite considerable losses in tanks and crews. The Commander of the assault infantry considers that the aggressive action of this squadron had the greatest effect upon their successful seizing of beach positions. He extolled the bravery and coolness of the squadron leader during the action. His actions on D Day were outstanding and his personal bravery and aggressive leadership was an inspiration to his troops. The support provided the assault infantry by this Squadron undoubtedly contributed largely to the success of the day’s accomplishment.DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
LCol Gordon Minto Churchill
Armour (1 Canadian Armoured Carrier Regiment) awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 20 October 1945 and CARO/6145 dated 22 October 1945. Citation found in Governor General’s correspondence, National Archives of Canada, RG.7 Group 26, Volume 59, dossier 7.In late October 44, LCol Churchill was selected to organise and command the newly authorised 1 Cdn Armd Carrier Regiment. This regiment was the outcome of the use of degunned Priests that had such outstanding success with the Canadians on operation “TOTALIZE” and later at Falaise, Le Havre and Calais as armoured infantry carriers, known generally as “Kangaroos”. LCol Churchill, within the space of slightly more than 2 months, from the time the regiment was authorised until committed to action, formed from a nucleus of one squadron, a regiment of fine standard. The splendid spirit engendered in the unit and the excellent standard of training achieved in such a short time was an outstanding accomplishment. There were many actions in which he displayed great courage and leadership. Early in January, he was ordered to support an attack on Wanssum Wood. This position had been unsuccessfully attacked in battalion strength on two occasions. Ground and weather conditions were extreme – ice and snow adding to the difficulties. LCol Churchill launched his Kangaroos into the attack at first light in a blinding snow storm. The infantry were placed on the objective without a casualty. His fine appreciation of the tactical problem and the handling thereof, was a great factor in the success of the operation and paved the way for the aggressiveness for which this regiment is well known.DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
Maj William Anderson Joyce
awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6074, both dated 22 September 1945. Maj Joyce rejoined the 10 Cdn Armd Regt from Staff on the 16 August 44 at which time he took over B Squadron. Throughout all actions in which this squadron has taken part, Maj Joyce has by his own personal bravery, distinguished conduct and fearless leadership, been a source of inspiration to all personnel under his command. These instances are cited as examples. At WOENSDRECT, when an enemy counter attack, with infantry and armoured Sps over-ran a company position, and threatened to cut off the remainder of the battalion, Maj Joyce, in his own tank, led a troop of tanks against this counter attack. He inflicted so many casualties on the enemy that they were forced to withdraw and restored the situation completely by putting our own infantry back on their former positions. In the RHINE crossing and in the pursuit through northern Holland and in Germany, Maj Joyce continued to set an exceptionally high standard of leadership. On the evening of 31 Mar 45, 2 Cdn Div’s advance was temporarily held up by a bridge being out at ULFT. The bridge was expected to be in place by 1900 hrs, but was not complete until 2100 hrs. The RHC had crossed the river at 1600 hrs and were well on their way forward. From the information gathered, their progress seemed quite good until they reached SILVOIDE, where the advance was held up. Maj Joyce went forward, contacted the battalion commander and with him formulated a plan. Information gained, showed the town of TERBORG defended by enfilade MG and 75mm fire covered the axis of advance from both flanks. By 0100 hrs on the 1 Apr 45, the plan was in operation. Half the squadron were put in position firing on the strong points to the west of the axis, and at the same time firing tracer along the axis lifting 100 yards every three minutes. The remainder of the squadron was used, one troop to advance with the leading infantry and the other to fire on strong points along the axis. Through the energy, control and resourcefulness of Maj Joyce, who boldly gave the very best supporting fire the infantry could expect, the objective was gained in the face of strong opposition. At approximately 0345 hrs, the advance was again held up by a road block. Tanks were used to clear this as they were later, – clearing the entire line of railway cars and other obstacles. Through this officer’s action, the infantry were able to consolidate their objective in the face of heavy opposition which would not have been possible without the close and efficient support given by the Squadron leader. The task of supporting 4 Brigade in the expanding of the bridgehead over the TRENT canal, 4 and 5 Apr 45, fell to Maj Joyce’s squadron. By his direct fire support, the bridgehead was enlarged quickly and thoroughly so that the infantry casualties for this action totaled three. This was in the face of determined opposition with small arms, bazookas, mortars, and anti-tank guns well sited. Ammunition was expended and replenished while the troops were still in the forward position. Maj Joyce has proved himself an outstanding leader of men in every respect. He is cool, dauntless, decisive, enthusiastic and exceptionally well liked and respected by the ORs and officers whom he leads. His is the type of leadership that gives a group of men the spirit necessary for success in arms.DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
Maj Bruce Fraser MacDonald
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5786, both dated 16 June 1945. In the planning of the Infantry cum Tank attack for the 19 Feb 45 on CALCAR, Germany, Maj MacDonald, 10 Cdn Armd Regt, gave valuable suggestions and advice. In the assault itself he was in command of “A” Squadron supporting the Essex Scottish. Very heavy enemy fire and smoke were encountered which made maintenance of direction and tactical control extremely difficult but, with no regard for his own personal safety, he led the attack with such skill and aggressiveness that the infantry were put on their objective with few casualties. Before consolidation was completed however, a counter attack supported by tanks developed, but despite heavy hostile machine gun, mortar, artillery and tank fire, severe casualties were inflicted on the enemy. During the counter attack, his tank was hit and the Essex lost their company commander. Although wounded, Maj MacDonald remained on the objective and assisted the infantry. Forced to evacuate the tank as a result of a second direct hit, he rallied the remaining infantry and by daring leadership enabled the position to be held for some time until their ammunition was completely expended and they had been over-run and captured by the enemy. With great forethought, Maj MacDonald disposed of his papers, and rank badges, and feigned a shell shocked trooper so convincingly that the enemy neglected to prevent his straggling and he eventually slipped into a slit trench and escaped. Though several miles behind the enemy lines he, due to careful observation, was able to retrace his steps to within 100 yards of the spot he had been captured. Despite the danger of recapture he took careful notes of enemy locations, identifications and equipment. On reaching the enemy forward positions he was pinned to the ground for four hours by our own barrage. The only protection he had was a slit trench dug with his own hands. Maj MacDonald’s brilliant leadership of his Squadron during the attack contributed greatly to the eventual success of the operation and his personal bravery was an example to all who engaged in the operation. The information he gained by careful attention to all he saw despite the danger involved was of great importance and may have a deciding influence on future operations. This officer’s bravery, tenacity, skill and forethought cannot be too highly commended.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
LCol Ronald Edward Alfred Morton 
Distinguished Service Order – Armour – awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 23 December 1944 and CARO/5235 dated 3 January 1945. On D Day and during every action since then in which his regiment has been involved, Lieutenant-Colonel Morton has shown outstanding leadership, ability and courage in handling his regiment and in the cooperative way he has worked with other arms. It was his skill and determination on D Day that largely contributed to the successful supporting of the 8 Canadian Infantry Brigade onto their objective which was considered of such importance to the successful landing and subsequent operation of 3 Canadian Infantry Division. During this action he personally attacked and destroyed with his tank an enemy battalion headquarters. On D+2 after he had organized and supervised a tank-infantry attack from Les Buissons onto Vieux Cairon and when subsequently withdrawing he personally protected a disabled tank until it was successfully towed to safety. On D+3 at Les Buissons he organized an attack to restore a situation. During this action his tank was hit by an ’88. He continued to fight until his tank was hit twice more by ’88s and set on fire. He got his crew out and withdrew them through the enemy infantry a distance of a mile. His splendid cooperation with 8 Canadian Infantry Brigade during the attack on Carpiquet and subsequently during the garrisoning of the area was a large contribution to the success of this battle. While performing the garrison duty of defending Carpiquet from 5 to 8 July 1944, his regiment was subjected to intense short range fire from three sides. He personally supervised the defensive arrangements and in so doing inspired his whole regiment with his coolness and confidence. From 12 to 18 July when his regiment was supporting 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade in the area of Verson, he displayed the same qualities as he had shown at Carpiquet and was an inspiring example not only to his own men but to the infantry with whom he was working. The splendid consistent display of courage, determination, cheerfulness and cooperation has been a most outstanding example of the best soldierly qualities and is worthy of the highest recognition.

On D Day and during every action since then in which his regiment has been involved, LCol Morton has shown outstanding leadership, ability and courage in handling his regiment and in the co-operative way he has worked with other arms. It was his skill and determination on D Day that largely contributed to the successful supporting of the 8 Cdn Inf Bde onto their objective which was considered of such importance to the successful landing and subsequent operation of the 3 Cdn Inf Div. During this action he personally attacked and destroyed with his tank an enemy Bn HQ. On D Day plus 2 after he had organised and supervised a tank-infantry attack from LES BUISSON onto VIEUX CAIRON and when subsequently withdrawing, he personally protected a disabled tank until it was successfully towed to safety. On D Day plus 3 at LES BUISSONS he organised an attack to rescue a situation. During this action his tank was hit by an 88mm. He continued to fight until his tank was hit twice more by 88s and set on fire. He got his crew out and withdrew them through the enemy infantry a distance of a mile. His splendid Cupertino with the 8 Cnd Inf Bde during the attack on CARPIQUET and subsequently during the garrisoning of the area was a large contribution to the success of this battle. While performing the garrison duty of defending CARPIQUET from the 5th to 8th July 44, his regiment was subjected to intense short range fire from 3 sides. He personally supervised the defensive arrangements and in so doing inspired his whole regiment with his coolness and confidence. From the 12th to 18th July when his regiment was supporting the 4 Cdn Inf Bde in the area of VERSON, he displayed the same qualities as he had shown at CARPIQUET and was an inspiring example not only to his own men but to the infantry with whom he was working. The splendid consistent display of courage, determination, cheerfulness and Cupertino has been a most outstanding example of the best soldierly qualities and is worthy of the highest recognition. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 23 December 1944 and CARO/5235 dated 3 January 1945.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE ORDER
LCol Eric Mackay Wilson
LCol Wilson commanded 10 Cdn Armd Regt (Fort Garry Horse) throughout the period 26 September to 3 November 1944, when this regiment was under command 2 Canadian Infantry Division, thus engaged in clearing the north shore of the Scheldt Estuary from ANTWERP to WALCHEREN. From the opening phase of this operation when 2 Canadian Infantry Division broke out from the 49 (British) Infantry Division bridgehead towards ST LEONARD, until a bridgehead was finally established across the causeway from SOUTH BEVELAND to WALCHEREN, the tanks played a vital and continuous part. Owing to the extended flank which rapidly developed, the armour was called upon to perform every conceivable role, sometimes operating with extremely limited infantry protection. In spite of the trying nature of the whole operation characterised by continual pressure against every form of obstacle in the way of mines, blocks, and almost impassable flooded terrain, LCol Wilson maintained continuous tank support for the infantry at every vital point. His relations with the other arms throughout could not be improved upon. His never failing willingness to help, and his quick appreciation of the difficulties faced by the infantry greatly eased the task of every infantry commander. LCOL Wilson by frequently visiting the forward areas, which involved trips of a most hazardous nature over routes only partially cleared of the enemy, was always completely “in the picture” when called upon to undertake a new task. His advice based on this familiarity with the battle situation, together with his experience as a tank commander in battle was of the greatest assistance to the divisional commander in making his plans. Regrouping of the forces was almost continuous due to the rapid movement and changing situation. This regrouping necessitated frequent moves and deployments on short notice, usually in darkness and often under most difficult conditions. Due to LCOL Wilson’s untiring efforts, his personal leadership and foresight, coupled with the high standard of training of the troops under his command, the tanks were always in the right place at the right time, thus making an outstanding contribution to the very successful Scheldt operation. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5786, both dated 16 June 1945. Governor General’s Records (RG.7 Group 26 Volume 59, dossier 59) has citation.

MILITARY CROSS
Capt Alexander Sutherland Christian
In the early afternoon of 6 Jun 44, Capt Christian was in command of a detachment of tanks supporting the infantry in clearing Tailleville. Though wounded in the early part of the attack, he commanded with skill and courage during successful action. Many enemy were slain and approximately 100 captured in this strongly defended area. His tank troop performed outstanding service in helping forward the North Shore Regiment onto their objective. This greatly assisted the whole advance inland on D Day. Capt Christian displayed outstanding leadership, personal courage and fortitude. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 19 August 1944 and CARO/4819 dated 26 August 1944. Recommended for immediate award by Lieutenant Colonel R.E.A. Morton, Commanding Officer, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment; duly supported by Brigadier R.A. Wyman (Officer Commanding, 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade), Major General R.F.L. Keller (General Officer Commanding, 3 Canadian Infantry Division) and Lieutenant General J.T. Crocker (Commander, 1 British Corps).

MILITARY CROSS
Lt Thomas William Danby
At 0215 hrs on 26 Feb 45, Lt Danby’s troop, 10 Cdn Armd Regt was ordered to move up to our FDLs to repel an enemy counter-attack which was threatening to overrun the forward positions of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry near CALCAR. If this counter-attack proved successful it would seriously disrupt our plans for a most important attack at 0430 hrs on the same date. The troop moved to a forward RHLI company HQ, which on arrival, was found burning due to enemy fire. Lt Danby’s tank led the way to the HQ where it was immediately knocked out as a result of a direct hit from a high velocity weapon. The hit wounded Lt Danby and brewed up his tank and he had, therefore, no alternative but to order the crew to bail out and make for a nearby barn. After dressing the co-driver’s wounds they discovered the flames in the tank had died down and that the engine was still running. Although enemy machine gun fire was brought to bear on them, they made a dash for, and managed to enter the tank where they found the transmission was damaged but that the tank would reverse at very low speed. By this time, Lt Danby was completely surrounded by enemy infantry and two AFVs, but in the few minutes allowed to him he had put the 75mm gun and co-ax into working order. Bringing fire to bear on the infantry which surrounded him, he destroyed two machine guns and killed or wounded many of the enemy who were caught off guard by fire from a supposedly burnt out tank. At this moment AP fire commenced from the right flank, and from the gun flash, Lt Danby could judge the location of the enemy gun fairly accurately, and that it had come from an AFV of some description. His position by this time had become extremely precarious and dangerous but without hesitation he traversed his 75mm gun and fired at the flash. A tremendous explosion followed and it was discovered later that he had destroyed a German Mk V Panther tank. Returning his attention to the enemy infantry around him he brought such deadly and accurate fire upon them that his co-driver was able to reverse the crippled tank into a safety area. The result of Lt Danby’s bravery, utter disregard of danger, and his deadly fire against heavy odds disrupted the enemy counter-attack to such an extent, that the RHLI were able to restore the situation which ensured the attack at 0430 hrs going in as planned. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5718, both dated 26 May 1945.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt James Alexander Fraser
On 9 June 44 Capt Fraser participated in an attack to relieve the defenders of LES BUISSON. During the operation he showed considerable daring and skill in carrying out several personal recces. During one of these, he successfully attacked the HQ of a Coy that was in a defensive position opposed to 3 Brit Div. His tank was eventually hit and destroyed which forced him and his crew to dismount. Though wounded in both arms, he showed great coolness and determination in reorganising his crew and leading them back to safety through the enemy lines. Then upon learning that one of the crew had been wounded and irregardless of his own safety, he returned to bring him back. His daring and unselfish actions were undoubtedly a great inspiration to all ranks. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 19 August 1944 and CARO/4819 dated 26 August 1944.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt Graeme Thomas Haig
(18 Canadian Armoured Car Regiment, 12th Manitoba Dragoons, later Hon Lt Col, FGH)
Recommended for immediate award 23 April 1945; document with 2 Canadian Corps, 25 April to 22 May 1945 before referral to Headquarters, First Canadian Army. On 7th April, 1945, Lt Haig’s troop was directed on MEPPEL 9556 via BALKBURG 0845 – T-road 050538 -MEPPEL. Information from two prisoners captured at BALKBURG and from civilians indicated that the enemy were withdrawing ten to fifteen minutes ahead of him towards MEPPEL and that some had taken up a position in woods 0846. When the lead scout car reached T-road 050537 they requested support from the troop leader’s armoured car. Lt Haig immediately moved ahead of the scout car and observed that there were forty to fifty Germans in this position but in view of the fact that he had achieved complete surprise decided this could be exploited to his advantage. In company with his sergeant’s car, he moved forward approximately one hundred yards engaging the enemy who had taken up positions in the buildings. As he did this he came under fire from two Panzerfausts. Although he appreciated that the enemy had recovered from this surprise and were in greater strength than he had at first considered, being in all the buildings around his vehicle and apparently most of them equipped with Panzerfausts, with complete disregard for personal safety and with outstanding leadership and direction to the remainder of his troop, Lt Haig pressed home the attack to the enemy. At the same time he called for support from fourth troop which was still engaging enemy approximately five miles to his rear. As the fighting progressed, him ammunition was almost expended when fourth troop arrived. He dismounted from his armoured car while still under intense enemy fire, obtained ammunition from an armoured car from fourth troop, issued orders to the supporting troop as to what targets to engage, and continued the fight. As a result of Lt Haig’s complete disregard for his personal safety, his outstanding leadership and skill under intense enemy small arms, machine gun and sporadic Panzerfaust fire, he killed approximately twelve enemy and forced the remainder to withdraw. This enable him to advance to the outskirts of MEPPEL, thereby securing the eastern approach to this town and contributing to the further disorganisation and demoralisation of the enemy which assisted in the sealing off of Northern Holland. Lt Haig’s leadership, determination to close with the enemy and example under fire were an inspiration to his men. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 11 August 1945.

MILITARY CROSS
Capt William Dalton Little
Capt Little commanded a troop of tanks in the first assault wave on 6 June 44. In the campaign through France and Belgium he established a reputation for bold decisive leadership. It is the action of 7 Oct 44, in Holland, however, for which he will be chiefly remembered. Capt Little had been detailed to support the infantry in an attack on HOOGEHEIDE. Without this town our forces could not cut the enemy communications between SOUTH BEVELAND and the WALCHEREN islands. But from the moment our infantry moved forward, they came under unexpectedly heavy mortar and machine gun fire. It was necessary to change the plan but there was no time for an Orders group. As soon as the danger became apparent, Capt Little went forward alone and on foot, to recce a better position for his own tanks. Following his recce, he placed his own tank in a very exposed flank, thus drawing fire while the rest of his tanks made the dash to the flank position he had chosen. Although his tank was hit several times, it was not knocked out. From their new position, the tanks were enabled not only to cover the advance of the infantry, but in doing so destroyed two machine guns, at least one mortar and two 40mm guns in addition to a great many infantry. A few moments later, the last obstacle to the town was removed when an enemy SP gun was destroyed by Capt Little’s own tank. The capture of HOOGEHEIDE isolated the enemy garrison and the approaches to ANTWERP. The personal courage of Capt Little contributed in an essential manner to this vital achievement. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

MILITARY CROSS
Capt Harry Louis Livingston
Capt Livingston joined the Fort Garry Horse on 18 Sep 44, and led a troop in action till 8 May 45. Throughout the campaign on many occasions, he has shown himself to be an officer of great initiative, aggression and courage. Such was the case on 16 Apr 45 near GRONINGEN, Holland, when his troop was in support of the Camerons of Canada. One company of Germans was firmly entrenched behind a formidable obstacle. Any attempt to approach the obstacle met with severe casualties. Due to the nature of the ground, the only position from which covering fire could be effective, was a location within a few dozen yards of the obstacle itself. One tank was crippled attempting to reach this spot and its crew commander seriously wounded. Capt Livingston, knowing full well the dangers involved, ordered his tank forward. Although hit several times, his vehicle was not knocked out and in a few minutes was in the coveted position. His fire was so effective that he not only destroyed the majority of the enemy, but prevented the remaining few from escaping, and took them prisoner. The infantry were enabled to advance with very few casualties, and the way was again open for a speedy advance from GRONINGEN to the EAST. Capt Livingston is an outstanding leader of men. He is cheerful yet a good disciplinarian, is cautious yet aggressive when aggression is necessary, is always resourceful and always dependable. He is respected by all ranks, and an inspiration to the men he leads. He is worthy of the highest commendation. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt Clarence Norman Nicolay
On 25 Apr 45 the Essex Scottish Regiment was given the task of advancing and making an assault on the enemy positions in DINSTEDE. Attached to the Essex Scottish Regiment for this operation was a troop of tanks under Lt Nicolay. This troop lead the Company’s advance. Lt Nicolay, leading in his own tank, did not wait for the minesweeping parties to clear the route ahead of the forward sections of infantry. By skilfully employing his tanks in this manner he shot up all possible enemy positions in front and well out to the flanks of the two leading platoons. He showed complete disregard for this own personal safety, in that his own tank was vulnerable to enemy anti-tank fire throughout the advance. By his courage and fearlessness he directed the remainder of his troop, overcoming all enemy positions. It was due to Lt Nicolay’s leadership, enthusiasm, and daring that the leading company reached its final objective with very few casualties. It is the firm belief of the officer commanding the leading company that the thirty prisoners of war taken and the larger number of enemy killed and wounded were part of a larger force that withdrew in confusion. The success of this attack was due to the maximum degree of close support and co-operation with the infantry on the part of the tanks and this fine example of support and co-operation with the infantry will long be remembered by the personnel of the Essex Scottish Regiment. The vigour of the attack put the Battalion on to its objective at once and permitted the remainder of the Brigade to position itself for the drive onto OLDENBURG. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6074, both dated 22 September 1945.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt Lloyd Gordon Queen
At 0430 hrs 26 Feb 45, A and B Squadrons of the 10 Cdn Armd Regt moved forward to capture the high ground dominating CALCAR. Three armoured regiments and three infantry battalions were engaged in this vital advance through 3000 yards of the SIEGFRIED LINE. Contrary to plans, tanks of the 10 Cdn Armd Regt found themselves spearheading the assault. Lt Queen, as point leader, thus became pathfinder of an entire brigade group. It was one of those rare occasions when the success of a major operations hinged upon the judgement of junior commander. Lt Queen, undismayed by the sudden responsibility thrust upon him and undeterred by heavy enemy fire, led the way forward to the exact objective on time. This feat required expert navigation in the dark which was only possible by Lt Queen dismounting from his tank and taking compass bearings. This was extremely hazardous due to the intense fire of all types being laid down by the enemy. By maintaining the proper direction over difficult ground despite poor visibility, and disregarding personal safety, Lt Queen saved scores of lives and made an outstanding contribution to the turning of the SIEGFRIED LINE. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5718, both dated 26 May 1945.

MILITARY CROSS
Lt John William Ritchie
On the night of 1 Apr 45, C Sqn was in support of the Black Watch of Canada, in an attack to bypass the town of DOETINCHEM and secure an objective beyond the outskirts of the town. 3rd Troop, commanded by Lt Ritchie was leading the way with a Coy of inf on his tanks. As he approached the town, a road block was encountered, and the Bn Comd ordered the Scout Offr to recce another route. In the darkness, the leading troop and company eventually found themselves in the midst of the town – and in an enemy fortress. Suddenly the enemy opened fire from all sides with small arms, MG’s, bazookas and self propelled gun fire. An HE shell struck Lt Ritchie’s tank wounding the infantry which were being carried. The troop Sgt.’s tank caught fire from incendiary bullets and the crew evacuated the tank in an attempt to extinguish the flames. Lt Ritchie ordered his guns into action immediately and with utter disregard for his own life, left his tank to remove the wounded from the deck and the immediate vicinity. The infantry were attempting to take up fire positions to cover a necessary withdrawal. In order to facilitate this, Lt Ritchie, without hesitations, moved his tank further ahead into the open to draw as much enemy fire as possible away from our own troops. From this forward position, he was able to engage enemy positions with even greater devastation. He continually shifted the position of his tank to avoid direct fire from the SPs. Such was the effect of fire from his guns that the infantry company was able to reorganise and withdraw slightly to better positions. Not satisfied with his effort up to then, Lt Ritchie then left his tank and attached a cable to the troop Sgt’s tank and had it towed to safety. After re-organisation, an attack was launched later that night. It was discovered that the fire from Lt Ritchie’s tank had not only completely disorganised the enemy but had inflicted severe casualties both killed and wounded. The SP gun had fled, and A/Tk gun was found knocked out, and a great many Germans were lying dead beside their bazookas. The position was taken with very few casualties as a result of his courageous and gallant action. For his outstanding courage, his leadership and quick thinking under heavy enemy fire, Lt Ritchie made possible the capturing of DOTTINGHEM and thus made it possible to continue the pursuit of the enemy. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5895, both dated 21 July 1945. Recommended for immediate award 15 April 1945; document with Headquarters, 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade, 20-21 April 1945; with Headquarters, First Canadian Army, 9-30 May 1945.

MILITARY CROSS
Capt Harvey Edward Theobald
Capt, then Lt, Theobald, landed with the unit on 6 Jun 44, and has served through the NWE campaign to the cessation of hostilities, on a number of occasions acting as Squadron Leader. His conduct and leadership was at all times an inspiration with all personnel with whom he came in contact. On a number of occasions in Normandy, Capt Theobald was outstanding. On 19 Feb 45, Capt then A/Maj Theobald was in command of B Squadron, Fort Garry Horse in support of the RHLI in the attack on CALCAR UDEM RD. The attack was held up several times by the strong enemy defences. Maj Theobald made several personal recces, coming under heavy direct enemy fire, to enable the tanks to be employed to the best advantage, the CO of the RHLI reporting to the CO of the FGH as follows: “Throughout the action Maj Theobald controlled and directed the movements of his command with exceptional skill. On many occasions, his masterful employment of his vehicles was directly responsible for the continuance of the advance by the infantry he supported. At all times he showed complete disregard for his own safety. His fortitude and courage were an inspiration to all ranks.” On the advance from ASSEN to GRONINGEN when the advance was held up by heavy enemy fire, Capt Theobald went forward personally, under heavy enemy fire, to recce the situation and his plan for disposing of the opposition was successful. On the 15th and 16th Apr in the fighting in GRONINGEN, Capt Theobald was continually in the forefront and on two occasions exposed himself to the enemy to draw fire and find enemy positions. He also acted as liaison between the tanks and infantry in a light tank, carrying out his duties several times under heavy fire from panzerfausts and 20mm guns. Capt Theobald has been outstanding during the course of the whole campaign in NWE and his fine leadership, personal bravery, fine soldierly qualities and spirit of sacrifice have been of the type that bring success in arms. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

MILITARY CROSS
Capt Cyril Dudley Aitken Tweedale
Capt Tweedale has shown constant energy, ability and personal bravery under fire since his first action on 9 Jun 44. On 9 Jun 44, he was a troop leader with the 6 Cdn Armd Regt (1H), and by his coolness, leadership and tactical ability, his troop destroyed three Panther tanks which were threatening the centre of the regiment; two of these were knocked out by his own tank. After this action, he was posted to his own unit, the 10 Cdn Armd Regt (FGH), and acted first as squadron rear link and later as Sqn 2IC in the defensive operations near ETERVILLE, BOURGUEBUS and VERRIERES on the 14 Jul , 27 Jul and 3 Aug respectively. He distinguished himself repeatedly in these actions by organizing OPs, assisting the supporting infantry and artillery and carrying out tank troop shoots, all of which required him to be repeatedly exposed to the most intense enemy artillery and mortar fire. His coolness under fire and his aggressiveness were an inspiration to his squadron during these difficult periods of defence. During the night advance on the 7/8 Aug, though suffering from an infection for which he was later evacuated, when he found his column was having difficulty getting forward in the dark, he dismounted, and with complete disregard for his own safety, and in the face of close enemy fire, he directed them forward from the ground. Later, when the squadron could proceed no further, in the absence of his squadron leader, he formed the tanks into a leaguer in the dark, despite persistent interference by enemy patrols. His display of personal courage, skill and energy have been outstanding in all operations and is worthy of the highest commendation. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 17 March 1945 and CARO/5466 dated 19 March 1945.

MILITARY MEDAL
Cpl John Alexander Byers
On the evening 23 Apr 45, C Sqn, 10 Cdn Armd Regt was in support of the Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada, in a defensive position slightly north of KIRCHATTEM, Germany. At approximately 1900 hrs, the enemy, in battalion strength launched a vicious counter attack supported by SP guns. Such was the suddenness and severity of the attack, that a complete platoon of C Company was cut off in a few moments. Cpl Byers, a crew commander in the 4th troop in support of C company, quickly assessed the critical situation, and without consideration of danger, moved his tank forward to a position 80 yards from the lost platoon. From here he was able to bring disastrous fire on the enemy, but at the same time exposed himself to fire not only from bazookas that were in an enemy held hedge but to the fire from two SP’s. The panzerfaust and SP’s immediately engaged Cpl Byers and did everything in their power to destroy him, but by courageously holding his ground and by well directed fire he destroyed one A/Tk gun and crew and two bazooka teams. The enemy infantry realising that their supporting guns were being knocked out became panic stricken and fled in haste, only to suffer more casualties from Cpl Byers’ gun in dead and wounded. For his quick thinking in sizing up a difficult situation in a moment, for his coolness, and above all – for his undaunted courage in seizing a suicidal task without thought for his own safety, Cpl Byers saved a critical situation and is deserving of the highest praise. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5934, both dated 4 August 1945.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Walter Chaulk
Sergeant Chaulk of 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment has fought with his regiment through France, Belgium, Holland and Germany. On many occasions during this period he has displayed great initiative and courage. Many instances could be cited, amongst them being Sergeant Chaulk’s part in the dash from Assen to Groningen on 13 April 1945. On this day Sergeant Chaulk was a crew commander in the lead tank in the point troop of the forward squadron. Speed of advance was imperative, and in view of this, the tanks were leading the way. Just south of Elde, Sergeant Chaulk noticed an enemy demolition party dashing to destroy a bridge some distance ahead. Regardless of the danger involved he ordered his tank ahead through heavy enemy fire and arrived in the vicinity of the bridge, not only in time to kill six Germans but in time to prevent the demolition. Pushing across the bridge, he moved to the outskirts of Groningen where the column was halted by a road block. To maintain the impetus of the advance Sergeant Chaulk dismounted from his vehicle and made a thorough reconnaissance of the obstacle. After fire from his guns proved ineffective and despite the inevitable mine field, the small arms and 20mm enemy fire, the Non Commissioned Officer on foot fastened cable to the obstacle and pulled it down with his tank. Pushing ahead into the city his tank was finally hit by a bazooka, killing one crew member and wounding and burning the crew commander. Although in great pain he remained to pinpoint enemy positions to the infantry and refused to be evacuated until his task had been completed. During this particular operation he was directly responsible for the destruction of one 20mm gun, two machine guns, five vehicles and killing of 15 and the wounding of twelve Germans. The gallantry and devotion to duty of this Non Commissioned Officer is deserving of the highest praise and his outstanding leadership throughout all operations has been an inspiration to all ranks. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6074, both dated 22 September 1945.

MILITARY MEDAL
LCpl Angus Douglas Elliot
At noon on the 19 Feb 45 tanks of the 10 Cdn Armd Regt moved forward to support the Essex Scottish. Their task was to help the infantry capture an enemy fortress area obstructing our advance to the RHINE. Just before the operation was to commence, LCpl Elliott was given the command of a tank in the point troop – his first command. Soon after reaching the objective half the attacking tank force were destroyed by fierce and accurate enemy fire. Before our infantry were able to dig in, a violent enemy counter attack, consisting of infantry and Panther tanks, overran the whole position. With blazing tanks all around, and despite murderous fire being brought to bear on him and his crew, LCpl Elliott held his ground with grim determination and courage. He directed the fire of his tank with such telling effect that the enemy suffered numerous casualties in trying to destroy him. Finally when his guns were out of ammunition, LCpl Elliott ordered his crew to bail out but not to retire. Setting up a defensive position near the tank, he and his crew by using their own personal weapons, fought off any attempt the enemy made to dislodge them, meanwhile inflicting severe casualties. When darkness fell, he and his crew crawled back to their tank and under the very nose of the Germans managed to bring it back to safety. There is no praise too high for this soldier, who when given his first command displayed such tenacity, determination and courage. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5718, both dated 26 May 1945.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Gregory John Eno
Sgt Eno, 10 Cdn Armd Regt, landed with the assaulting forces on the NORMANDY beachhead on D Day as a troop sergeant. He not only distinguished himself in his capacity as troop sergeant, but on many occasions in the absence of the troop officer, performed the duties of the troop leader in an admirable fashion. Such was the case on 7 Oct 44 during an attack on HOOGERHEIDE, Holland. Sgt Eno’s troop was held up by one Panther tank, which was so concealed that it could not effectively be engaged by our own guns. Sgt Eno volunteered to remove the Panther, knowing full well the difficulties of engaging it with his Sherman. With complete disregard for his own safety, he dashed across open ground to get the enemy tank inside the effective range of his master gun. No sooner had he accomplished this, than a well aimed shot made a direct hit on the final drive of his tank. The tank did not burn, and the crew remained in the vehicle and returned the fire. The Panther, missing with its second shot, never received another chance. The first shot from Sgt Eno’s tank made a direct hit and burned the enemy tank. With the removal of the Panther, the way was clear for the advance. Sgt Eno’s cool and calculating decisions, his initiative and above all his courage, have always been an inspiration to his men. He is to be highly commended, and is worthy of the highest praise. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Robert Donald Gauthier
On the evening of 14 August 1944, 10 Canadian Armd Regt (Fort Garry Horse) was ordered to take and hold the high ground north of FALAISE. Sgt Gauthier was a crew commander in the leading troop. On reaching the forward slope of the objective, this troop came under heavy anti-tank fire from two enemy 88 mm guns, which knocked out the other two tanks in the troop, hit Sgt Gauthier’s tank and wounded two of his crew. He appreciated the fact that these guns dominated the objective and approaches thereto and that before a successful occupation of the vital ground could be achieved, they would have to be destroyed or removed. Despite the casualties in his own tank, he promptly carried out an attack and proceeded to knock out one of the 88mm guns and forced the other one to withdraw in such a manner that it was destroyed by another troop. In the face of the enemy who held a decided advantage and with two members of his crew wounded, he displayed great courage, tactical ability and determination which resulted in the destruction of two enemy guns and the occupation of the objective more swiftly and successfully then could otherwise have been achieved. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 December 1944 and CARO/5217 dated 23 December 1944.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Arthur Balfour Jones
On 18 Sep 44 “B” Squadron, 10 Armd Regt was supporting the SD&G Highlanders in an attack on MONT LAMBERT, part of the defences of BOULOGNE. The state of the battle did not allow the tanks to disengage for the purpose of refilling, which necessitated ammunition being delivered to the tanks on the battlefield. At approximately 1400 hrs an ammunition lorry was ordered forward, but owing to the condition of the ground and enemy shelling, it could not complete the trip. Sgt Jones, a fitter, 10 Cdn Armd Regt, who was in charge of a half track fitters lorry, immediately volunteered with his crew to deliver the ammunition. From BADHUTT FARM to MONT LAMBERT, a distance of 2000 yds, the road was continually being shelled by the enemy. As the half track climbed the slope of the MONT it was subjected to the particular attention of enemy guns, resulting in one of the crew being seriously wounded. During the trip the vehicle became mire and in the face of heavy enemy fire, Sgt Jones recced another route which enabled the lorry to proceed, although it entailed crossing a known minefield. In face of all these difficulties, the ammunition was delivered forward to the Squadron. A heavy and continuous expenditure of ammunition over a period of time against casemated reinforced concrete pill boxes was essential to enable the infantry to close with the enemy. Any interruption to this fire would have resulted in heavy infantry casualties and would have prejudiced the success of that phase of the battle. The courageous perseverance shown by Sgt Jones insured that continuous fire support was maintained at the required intensity. Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/ 5265, both dated 13 January 1945.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt George Eric Murray
Sergeant Murray landed on the Normandy beach head on 6 June 1944 with the assault troops, and has been in action with his troop until 8 May 1945. He has proved himself an excellent leader of men, cool, courageous and possessing a sound combat ability. On 23 October 1944 on the drive north from Antwerp to Bergen op Zoom, Sergeant Murray, acting as Troop Leader, was responsible for left flank protection for the squadron. During the advance his aggressive fighting led to the destruction of two machine gun posts. Just short of the final objective, the infantry were held up by enfilade fire at a cross roads. Without consideration of personal risk, Sergeant Murray went forward on foot to reconnoitre the situation. He then asked for permission to move his troop forward without infantry support. His surprise move was carried out with such skill that an anti-tank gun and crew were taken undamaged. The disorganization caused by this swift move allowed the troop to hold the objective until the infantry arrived. Sergeant Murray since 6 June 1944 has proved himself a man of sound decisions, cool and courageous, and most aggressive. He is considered worthy of the highest commendation. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 10 November 1945 and CARO/6193 dated 12 November 1945.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Harry Warren Strawn
During the action in ROTS on the 11 Jun 44, after the remainder of his troop had been destroyed, this NCO carried on the fight with determination and initiative. Having determined the location of a Panther tank that was in a prepared ambush position, he successfully engaged it by firing through the building. Subsequently, while withdrawing through the village he fought his tank with great skill and destroyed another Panther. He showed outstanding courage and ability in performing a task where the enemy had a decided and obvious advantage. His action was an excellent example of cool, reasoned efficiency against odds and resulted in the destruction of much enemy equipment. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 19 August 1944 and CARO/4819 dated 26 August 1944.

MILITARY MEDAL
Sgt Harley Walterson
Shortly after landing and during the assault on the beach defences in St Aubin-sur-Mer on 6 Jun 44, several enemy strong points were holding up the advance of our infantry. Sgt Walterson, a tank crew commander, observed the strong point in particular and on his own initiative and in face of heavy fire, directed his troop onto it. This action resulted in the silencing of a 75 mm gun which was causing great trouble; some thirty of the enemy were killed and upwards of one hundred others surrendered. It was owing to his coolness, courage and skill that the strong point was knocked out thus enabling our infantry to gain their immediate objective. His actions are worthy of highest commendation. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 19 August 1944 and CARO/4819 dated 26 August 1944.

MEMBER, ORDER of the BRITISH EMPIRE
RQMS Robert Blaikie Carter
RQMS Carter has had 31 years service, 7 1/2 of it Active in the last war and this and all but three with this regiment. He was the first man to mobilise with the Regiment in this war with the rank of SSM, which he held in the N.P.A.M. for several years. He was promoted RQMS in Dec 1941 and had recently been sent to C.A.C.R.U. on account of age, though otherwise fit. This WO is loyal, industrious and very capable. He possesses considerable personality and unfailing cheerfulness. Throughout his long service, he has been a splendid example to all and of great assistance to his Regiment. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 1 January 1944 and CARO/3973 dated 8 January 1944.

MEMBER, ORDER of the BRITISH EMPIRE
H/Capt William Edward Harrison
H/Capt Harrison landed with the unit on 6 Jun 44 and served continuously through the whole North West Europe campaign until cessation of hostilities. By his complete disregard of personal danger, his fine personal example, devotion to duty and constant thought of the care and comfort of the troops under his charge, H/Capt Harrison won and holds the admiration and highest personal regard of everyone with whom he has come in contact. H/Capt Harrison was personally in forward positions during every unit action to see to the welfare and comfort of the wounded. His devotion to duty took him many times under heavy enemy fire in his endeavour to help in the recovery of the wounded and of the bodies of personnel killed in action. On occasions he had personnel working with killed and wounded from mines, booby traps and enemy shell fire. His constant efforts to locate the bodies of killed and missing personnel have resulted in the unit having very few now listed as missing and an early record of casualties with saving of suffering to next of kin. No commendation can fully bear tribute to the wonderful work done by H/Capt Harrison during the campaign.

MEMBER, ORDER of the BRITISH EMPIRE
Maj Frederick Thomas Jenner
From the time A/LCOL Jenner was appointed as GS01 to the BRAC Branch HQ First Cdn Army his zeal in carrying out the duties of his appointment was mainly responsible for the large measure of success achieved in equipping Cdn Armd Formations prior to the Normandy Operation. His keenness and untiring efforts engendered an extremely close bond between Regimental and Staff personnel, with consequent mutual confidence so essential before an operation of this nature. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 23 December 1944 and CARO/5235 dated 3 January 1945.

MEMBER, ORDER of the BRITISH EMPIRE
Maj Gordon Gerald MacKenzie
Captain (Quartermaster)
This officer enlisted in his regiment, the 10 Armoured Car Regiment (Fort Garry Horse) on mobilization in September 1939. He was commissioned from the ranks as Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant to be Quartermaster in June 1941. Throughout his service, he has carried out his duties with outstanding efficiency. Since mobilization, this regiment has had fourteen different stations and has been on five different war establishments as well, it has had changing scales and types of equipment to deal with. All this has thrown an exceptional strain upon the “Q” Branch of the regiment. Captain MacKenzie is zealous, energetic, loyal, intelligent and co-operative to an unusual degree. In his work, he has shown special powers of leadership to the personnel under him and is honest and helpful to all ranks of the regiment. It is considered that the present efficiency of the regiment is in no small measure due too his work since mobilization and that he is worthy of high recognition. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 8 June 1944 and CARO/4568 dated 9 June 1944.

*** MEMBER, ORDER of the BRITISH EMPIRE
Major Stanley Henry Muton
This officer served overseas in the war 1914-1919 and in the Non-Permanent Active Militia from 1931 until joining the Active Army on 1 September 1939. The outstanding feature of this officer’s service is loyalty. Prior to and during this war he has displayed this characteristic to a marked degree. He is fully dependable and can be fully replied upon to faithfully discharge any duties great or small. Major Mutton has served efficiently as both a regimental and staff officer during this war. His exceptional devotion to duty and loyalty to all ranks is considered worthy of immediate recognition Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 8 June 1944 and CARO/4568 dated 9 June 1944.

BRITISH EMPIRE MEDAL
Staff Sergeant George William MacKay Forgie
Staff-Sergeant Forgie, Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, has been attached to 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment (Fort Garry Horse) since January 1940. He landed in France in June 1944 and served through all the North West European campaign. All through the campaign the responsibility for the preparedness of the weapons used by the unit for action rested upon this Non-Commissioned Officer and the outstanding successes achieved by the unit on so many occasions bear tribute to the high standard of his work. Staff-Sergeant Forgie’s devotion to duty under all conditions and at times under enemy fire, his untiring efforts, and fine soldierly qualities cannot be too highly commended and have eared the respect and admiration of all with whom he has been in contact. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 15 December 1945 and CARO/6276 dated 18 December 1945.

BRITISH EMPIRE MEDAL
Tpr Amie Jules Lalonde
This man displayed great presence of mind, devotion to duty and disregard for his own personal safety when on 14th September 1942 a tank of which he was the driver caught fire. Before being driven from the driver’s seat by the fire he set the controls so that the tank would run downhill away from the petrol dump where he was refuelling at the time. He remained as it ran out of control down a hill and fought the fire with the vehicle’s fire extinguisher in such a cool and successful manner that the fire was brought under control and the tank saved. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 1 January 1943 and CARO/2983 dated 4 January 1943; confirmed in CARO/3580 dated 2 September 1943.
*** (14 Canadian Army Tank Regiment, The Calgary Tank Regiment)

MENTIONED IN DISPATCHES

*** SSM Ralph Betts Akersteam
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

Captain Walter George Beatty
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

Tpr Noel Amedee Joseph Cantin
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5324, both dated 3 February 1945.

Sigmn WJ Carson

Sgt Henry John Clifford Cook
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5512, both dated 31 March 1945

*** SSM Ernest Harold Crabb
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

Maj Charles Wesley Fletcher (KIA)
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5512, both dated 31 March 1945.

Capt (A/Maj) Edwin Alan Goodman
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5512, both dated 31 March 1945.

***Sgt James Ross Goodman
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5801, both dated 23 June 1945.

Capt James Frederick Mill Hall (KIA)
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5324, both dated 3 February 1945.

H/Capt William Edward Harrison

Sgt (A/WOII) Douglas H Isset
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

*** Sergeant John Samuel Lower
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

Tpr Frederick Arthur Lusk
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5324, both dated 3 February 1945.

SSM William A Martin
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5342, both dated 3 Feb 45

Captain (Acting Major) Hugh Watt MacEwing
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

Capt William Edward McAleese (died of wounds)
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 17 Mar 1945 and CARO/5466 dated 19 Mar 45

Sgt John Martin McCumber
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/6114, both dated 6 Oct 45

*** Corporal (Acting Sergeant) William Ernest Nelson McMILLAN
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

SSM William Stanley Miller
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5324, both dated 3 February 1945.

Trooper Lloyd Hamblet Noakes
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

***Sergeant John Edward Rogers
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

Captain (Acting Major) Norman Robert Rushforth
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

*** Lance-Corporal John Eddy Selman
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

Sgt John Olaf Henry Shineton
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5801, both dated 23 June 1945.

***Captain (Acting Major) Harvey Edward Theobald
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 6 October 1945 and CARO/6114 of that date.

SSM William Tough
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5801, both dated 23 June 1945.

LCpl Charles John Wesa
Awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5512, both dated 31 March 1945.

COMMANDER IN CHIEF’S CERTIFICATE

SQMS William Campbell

Capt John G Fulton

Tpr George Halasz

Cpl John Jacobson

Capt JP Lunderville

Capt Neil Mansfield McDougall

Tpr JA McLellan

Sgt Henry Weibe

Foreign Awards – Second World War

CROIX DE GUERRE avec Etoile d’Argent (France)
Lt Albert Graham Coulter
Captain Coulter of 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment joined his regiment in France in September 1944 and fought with it until VE Day. In the assault on Boulogne on 18 September 1944 Captain Coulter’s troop spearheaded the attack. Regardless of minefields and demolitions, he was the first to lead his troop, often on foot, to Mount Lambert, the fortress guarding the entrance to the city from the south. Awarded as per CARO/6854 dated 25 November 1946.

CROIX DE GUERRE avec Etoile de Vermeil (France)
Capt Vernon Theodore Luther Eriksson
On the 7th Aug 44, Capt Eriksson was Troop Leader 4 Troop, C Squadron, 10 Cdn Armd Regt, which was acting as guard troop. Two other troops of the Squadron were to find and effect a crossing of the LAISON RIVER, but on approaching the stream were forced to stop due to intense enemy mortar and machine gun fire. Realising that it was vital to make a crossing to maintain the momentum of the advance, Capt Eriksson proceeded forward with his troop. On reaching the stream he dismounted with his co-driver, and although under heavy enemy fire, they managed to make a firm bottom with sticks and logs thus enabling his troop to cross. After the regiment had come up, Capt Eriksson’s troop exploited along the bank of the stream until reaching an anti-tank ditch protected by a clump of trees on a steep slope. Charging the slope he succeeded in gaining the crest of the hill where he was met by heavy enemy fire. His troop then took up hull-down positions and defended the crossing until the remaining tanks had crossed the river. By his persistence and daring, under intense enemy fire, Capt Eriksson made possible the continuance of the advance which meant so much to the eventual closing of the “Falaise Gap”. Awarded as per CARO/5625 dated 28 April 1945. Recommendation originated with unit on 14 December 1944; held by Field Army Headquarters, 20 December 1944 to 8 January 1945.

***CROIX DE GUERRE avec Etoile de Vermeil (France)
Major Bruce Fraser MacDonald DSO
Officer with Headquarters of 2 Canadian Armoured Regiment, during the French campaign in 1944, showed proof, in his functions, of a remarkable spirit of comprehension towards French civil authorities, as well as to the Fighting Forces of the Interior, particularly at Hazebrouk. During an attack in the Cleves region, 19 February 1945, his car received three direct hits; he was taken prisoner; he managed to escape the following night, reaching Allied lines with valuable information regarding the enemy. Awarded as per CARO/6763 dated 23 September 1946.

Croix de Guerre avec Etoile de Vermeil (France)
Capt Neil Mansfield McDougall
At approximately 1200 hrs on D Day, Capt McDougall, who was acting as Tank Unit Landing Officer for Brigade Headquarters, landed with RHQ 27 Cdn Armd Regt on the beach opposite BERNIERES-SUR-MER. He immediately moved inland to recce a pre-selected area well forward where Brigade Headquarters was to be established. He then returned to the beach to arrange for the detailed landing of Brigade vehicles. On finding that these would not be landed for some time, he again proceeded inland and gave invaluable assistance in controlling and directing traffic which was often done while exposed to enemy fire. None of Brigade Headquarters vehicles landed until the night of D Day plus 1 and most of them not until late on D Day plus 1. Consequently Capt McDougall and his jeep, which was equipped with a W/T set, were used extensively by the Brigade Commander. Under the most difficult conditions, in which enemy sniping played a prominent part, he successfully maintained communications with both Brigade Headquarters afloat and the regiments taking part in the battle. This was of the most vital importance insofar as it was the only means of control that could be exercised from Brigade during this period. He subsequently resumed his normal duties which included the recce of a number of positions. This required him to proceed into the forward area where he was exposed to heavy enemy fire. He performed his multitudinous tasks most efficiently and without regard for his personal well being. The cheerful manner in which he has accomplished his work and the thoroughness and excellence thereof, have been an example of the finest spirit and has fostered a high sense of duty in all those who have been associated with him in this operation. Awarded as per CARO/5625 dated 28 April 1945. Recommendation originated with unit on 17 December 1944; held by Field Army Headquarters, 20 December 1944 to 8 January 1945. The following is the original text; further along it was edited so that “At approximately 1200 hours” became “At noon”, etc.

Croix de Guerre avec Etoile de Vermeil (France)
Capt Donald Mighton McPherson
On 11 June 44, Capt McPherson was Troop Leader of 2 Troop, A Squadron, 10 Cdn Armd Regt. The regiment had been ordered to clear the valley south to, and including the village of ROTS, 2 Troop being ordered into the village itself. The enemy defence consisted of infantry and tanks which resisted tenaciously any attempt made to dislodge them. Penetration was made into the town but the necessity of fighting in such close quarters was not without costs. Five of our tanks were hit and several personnel of the crews were wounded. In spite of being wounded himself, Capt McPherson remained with his men rendering first aid, rallied the remaining tanks and organised them so skilfully that the village was held until assistance arrived at first light the following morning. Even though wounded, the leadership and gallantry exhibited by Capt McPherson in the face of the enemy fire, made possible the success of the operation and enabled the holding of vital ground. Awarded as per CARO/5625 dated 28 April 1945. Recommendation appears to have been raised in unit, 14 December 1944, and with Headquarters, First Canadian Army, 20 December 1944 to 8 January 1945.

CHEVALIER of the LEGION OF HONOUR (France)
CROIX DE GUERRE avec Palme (France)
LCol (Acting Col), Ronald Edward Alfred Morton DSO
Commander of a Canadian armoured regiment. Fought from 6 to 11 June 1944 in the landing operations in Normandy, from 3 to 11 July in the offensives around Carpiquet, from 13 to 20 July in the defence of Verson, from 25 to 30 July at Bourguevus. During the night of 7/8 August led the night attack which pierced the enemy’s front line to Bretteville Lanngannerie, from 8 to 12 August, the battle of Trun and the pursuit to the Seine from 20 to 28 August. Awarded as per CARO/6763 dated 23 September 1946.

Croix de Guerre avec Etoile d’Bronze (France)
Sgt Bryon Ronald Paulson
On the 8 August 44, Sgt Paulson was a crew commander, recce troop, 10 Armd Regt. On that date he was ordered to recce the forward edge of QUESNAY WOOD. As he approached the forest, his tank burst into flames as a result of a hit from an unknown weapon. As soon as he and the crew had evacuated the tank, they came under heavy enemy MG fire. Subsequently, the blaze went out and Sgt Paulson ordered the crew back leading the way himself but was wounded severely in the process, a bullet passing through his face and mouth. The balance of the crew were also wounded, one fatally, but one member managed to climb inside. Driving the tank himself, he dragged the other wounded member of the crew through a ditch by means of a trailing tow cable. Before the tank could get clear of the enemy it was hit once more, this time by a bazooka. Sgt Paulson again evacuated the tank and continued to fight the enemy by manning a Bren Gun nearby. He inflicted many casualties until eventually evacuated because of his wounds. No only was his courage and devotion to duty an example to all ranks but during this extremely difficult and hazardous period, he continually passed back valuable information to his regiment. This information in itself contributed materially to the operation being brought to a successful conclusion. Awarded as per CARO/5625 dated 28 April 1945. Originated by unit, 14 December 1944; with Headquarters, 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade until 17 December 1944; with Headquarters, 2 Canadian Corps, 17-19 December 1944; cleared Headquarters, First Canadian Army, 8 January 1945.

CHEVALIER of the ORDER of LEOPOLD II with Palm (Belgium)
CROIX DE GUERRE 1940 avec Palme (Belgium)
Major Norman Robert Rushforth
On the 30 September 1944, Major Rushforth, Officer Commanding, “A” Squadron, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment was given the dreaded task of clearing an enemy- held distillery commanding the approaches to St.Leonards, Belgium. This village was known to be the hinge of a doggedly held German stand guarding the eastern approaches to the Scheldt Estuary. Although exhausted from two days and nights of continuous heavy fighting, and with only six tanks remaining in the squadron, Major Rushforth undertook the job with cheerfulness and grim determination. In the cold light of dawn the Squadron Leader inched his way forward on a most dangerous reconnaissance. Quite regardless of a head injury received from a sniper’s bullet, he continued through heavy machine gun, mortar and artillery fire. When sure of the exact location of the enemy, he returned to lead his squadron. Despite the few tanks under his command, Major Rushforth successfully attacked and seized his objective. His skilful manoeuvring of tanks to sweep the German positions with heavy fire resulted in the destruction of an 88-mm anti-tank gun, and capture of many prisoners. This was possible only because of his thorough and accurate reconnaissance under great risk. During the whole action, Major Rushforth displayed a grim and tenacious devotion to duty, and a brilliance of manoeuvre and coolness of leadership that inspired the men under his command. He has contributed directly to the success of the operations which led to the liberation of Belgium. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 31 August 1946 and CARO/6733 dated 2 September 1946.

CROIX DE GUERRE 1940 avec Palme (Begium)
Cpl Garnet Orville Scarrow
In the operation north of the Antwerp-Turnhout Canal on 28 September 1944, Corporal Scarrow and his Troop Sergeant were detailed to support infantry troops to break into the outskirts of the town of St.Lennards. At the start time, however, the Troop Sergeant’s tank was knocked out by a concealed 75-mm, and as the crew began to bail out, machine guns forced part of the crew to remain in the already burning armoured fighting vehicle. Promptly, Corporal Scarrow brought his fire down on the machine guns, allowing the tank crew to get to safety and at the same time putting two enemy machine guns out of action. Eight prisoners were taken and Corporal Scarrow moved ahead alone until a second anti-tank gun put his own tank out of action. // In every action this Non-Commissioned Officer gave evidence of not only considerable fighting ability and skill but complete disregard for his own safety in his efforts to get the job done. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 31 August 1946 and CARO/6733 dated 2 September 1946. Recommended by Lieutenant-Colonel E.M. Wilson, Commanding Officer, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment; document with Headquarters, Canadian Forces in the Netherlands, 2 August to 6 October 1945 where it was supported by Brigadier J.F. Bingham, senior Armoured Corps officer, and signed off by Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds. //

CROIX DE GUERRE 1940 avec Palme (Belgium)
Tpr Alexander Murdock Martin
On 2 October 194, Trooper Martin was acting as gunner for Sergeant Jorgenson, the Troop Leader detailed to lead the advance on the right hand axis westward from Brecht into the town of Steinhoven on the Antwerp-Turnhout Canal. Their advance was temporarily halted by intense gun fire, until the Troop leader giving [gave ?] Trooper Martin the order “gun control”, to seek out the enemy guns, ordered the troop to advance. Trooper Martin first observed enemy movement around a haystack which he hit with his ranging shot at 1,500 yards and destroyed an 88-mm gun concealed beneath the hay. With his machine gun, Trooper Martin then killed the crew trying to make their escape. Sighting a second anti-tank gun crew preparing to fire on his troop, Trooper Martin scored a second direct hit to put it out of action. A party of 40 of the enemy then appeared from hiding places and ran to their rear in a panic. Trooper Martin continued to fire his machine gun into them, adding to the fire of the rest of the troop. A third 88-mm gun was abandoned with two ammunition lorries and approximately 30 of the enemy killed in this action, which lasted for only five minutes. The skill and coordination of this man together with his ability to at promptly on his own initiative made possible a divisional entry into Steinhoven without further fighting and loss of life. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 31 August 1946 and CARO/6733 dated 2 September 1946. Recommended by Lieutenant-Colonel E.M. Wilson, Commanding Officer, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment; with Headquarters, Canadian Forces in the Netherlands, 2 August to 6 October 1945 where it was successively passed by Brigadier J.F. Bingham and Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds.

CROIX DE GUERRE 1940 avec Palme (Belgium)
Cpl Orley Robert McClure
Corporal McClure of 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment was employed as a tank gunner throughout the whole campaign in Northwestern Europe. Though seriously wounded in France, he returned to the unit and participated in the vicious battles in the liberation of Braschaat and Nordeind, Belgium. // On the 3 October 1944, near Braschaat, when Corporal McClure’s troop was caught in a devastating anti-tank cross fire, quite regardless of the risk, he chose an exposed position to cover a flanking manoeuvre of the troop. Although hit several times by heavy fire, he unflinchingly continued to lay his guns on the enemy until the movement was completed. // On 8 October 1944, at Nordeind, and under similar circumstances, when a tank belonging to his troop was knocked out, he deliberately exposed his own vehicle to the enemy to draw fire while the remaining tanks manoeuvred to a flank. Before the movement was completed, his own tank was destroyed and himself severely wounded. Quite regardless of his injury, he assisted the other crew members to safety. // This Non-Commissioned Officer has given conspicuously hood leadership, and has been an inspiring example to his fellow soldiers in every action in which he has participated. Devoted to duty, cool and decisive under the most trying of conditions, coupled with a keen sense of responsibility, Corporal McClure has made a marked contribution to the success of operations in Belgium.
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 31 August 1946 and CARO/6733 dated 2 September 1946. Recommended by Lieutenant-Colonel E.M. Wilson, Commanding Officer, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment; document with Headquarters, Canadian Forces in the Netherlands, 21 September to 6 October 1945 when signed off by Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds.

BRONZE STAR MEDAL (United States)
Lt. (Acting Capt) Capt. Frank Paul Davidson
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 30 March 1946 and CARO/6478 dated 1 April 1946.
For meritorious service in connection with military operations for 14 Aug 1944 to 8 May 1945. As Intelligence Officer of the 10th Canadian Armoured Regiment, Captain Davidson distinguished himself in the accomplishment of tasks of an exacting and detailed nature. His conduct in this position of great responsibility was admirable and contributed greatly the success of Allied Operations.

***BRONZE STAR MEDAL (United States)
Sgt Douglas Geoffrey Welland
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 30 March 1946 and CARO/6478 dated 1 April 1946.

OFFICER, ORDER OF ORANGE-NASSAU WITH SWORDS (Holland)
LCol Eric Mackay Wilson
Lieutenant-Colonel, then Major, Wilson landed with the unit on D Day as second in command and took part in every action which the unit was engaged in from that day until cessation of hostilities. Through all actions in which the regiment took part he was by his own distinguished conduct and outstanding leadership a source of inspiration to all personnel under his command. Lieutenant-Colonel Wilson took over command of the regiment in August 1944 and led the unit to Boulogne. All during the Antwerp Canal and Zuid Beveland campaign, the unit was under command of 2 Canadian Infantry Division and Lieutenant-Colonel Wilson fought his regiment very skilfully under conditions most unfavourable to tank action. The success achieved during that time bears witness to the careful planning, organization and administration of Lieutenant-Colonel Wilson. On a number of occasions he prepared and submitted complete plans for operations and had much to do with the success of the campaigns. Under Lieutenant-Colonel Wilson’s command, the Fort Garry Horse carried out in an outstanding manner every duty it was called upon to perform and the successes are a direct tribute to his fine leadership, initiative, devotion to duty, careful planning and fine personal soldierly qualities. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/6291 dated 24 December 1945.

OFFICER, ORDER OF ORANGE-NASSAU WITH SWORDS (Holland)
LCol John Hippolyte Wickey
Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 March 1947 and Canadian Army Order 12/47 dated 31 March 1947.

ORDER OF THE BRONZE CROSS (Holland)
Sgt. Andrew James Kirk
Sergeant Kirk, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment, came to France in June 1944 employed as Regimental Transport Sergeant. He held this position throughout the campaigns of France, Belgium, Holland, and Germany, and during that time built himself a reputation of efficiency second to none. During the savage attack on Boulogne on 18 September 1944, Sergeant Kirk on four occasions personally led the petrol and ammunition column through mortar and shell fire. His personal example of bravery was an inspiration to all in the echelon. At Woensdrecht, Holland, Sergeant Kirk again performed duties of an exceptionally dangerous nature. The only road leading to the forward tanks was under observation from the enemy who laid down mortar and shell fire at every vehicle passing along the road. It was through Sergeant Kirk’s example of courage and disregard for enemy fire that the supplies were enabled to reach the tanks. Apart from his supply delivery duties, the fact that the trucks were always kept in first-class condition was due to Sergeant Kirk’s close supervision of maintenance and repair. Sergeant Kirk has proven himself a most capable Non-Commissioned Officer, efficient in supervision and courageous in the face of the enemy. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/dated 24 December 1945. Recommendation raised 22 June 1945.

ORDER OF THE BRONZE LION (Holland)
Captain Cyril Burgoyne
Lieutenant Burgoyne joined the 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment in August 1944, and since that time participated in every major operation in which the unit was engaged. On all occasions he proved himself an expert in man management and in tactical problems. Above all he proved himself a man of great courage and gallantry. In October 1944, during the savage battle for Woensdrecht, Holland, Lieutenant Burgoyne’s squadron was held up by heavy enemy fire from concrete emplacements, and the attack was in grave danger of failing. Lieutenant Burgoyne volunteered to remove the concrete emplacements. Quite regardless of the heavy enemy small arms fire, he made a personal reconnaissance through our forward defended localities and returned with a plan of attack. He led his troop forward through heavy enemy cross fire from antitank guns, and although his tank was hit at least twice, he ignored the enemy guns and concentrated his gunfire on the concrete emplacements. Not only did he destroy the concrete emplacements, but was successful in killing a great many of the occupants and capturing at least eight others. The way was thus opened for a rapid advance, and this was accomplished with few casualties. Lieutenant Burgoyne has always been responsible and dependable, quick to grasp a situation and take initiative promptly, and exceptionally quick and decisive in action. Above all, he is a courageous soldier, well deserving admiration and praise for his actions. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/6291 dated 24 December 1945. Recommended 23 June 1945 as a Lieutenant by LieutenantColonel E.M. Wilson, Commanding Officer, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment (Fort Garry Horse); passed to 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade Headquarters on 25 June and approved by Brigadier G.W. Robinson; with Headquarters, Canadian Forces in the Netherlands, 20 August to 26 September 1945 when signed off by LieutenantGeneral G.G. Simonds.

ORDER OF THE BRONZE LION (Holland)
Cpl Herbert Creek
Corporal Creek, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment, received his battle initiation as a tank gunner on the Normandy beaches before H Hour, 6 June 1944. As crew commander, he fulfilled his responsibilities in almost every action until VE Day. On 28 March 1945 at Gendrinbgen, Holland, Corporal Creek’s troop was held up by an enemy self-propelled gun so cleverly protected by buildings that it could not be effectively dealt with by tank guns. Without hesitation he dismounted from his tank, and assisted only by his co-driver, worked his way forward and took the gun crew completely by surprise from the rear, and captured the crew and the gun intact. Corporal Creek has proved himself resourceful, most courageous and a skilful Non-Commissioned Officer in the face of great danger. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/6291 dated 24 December 1945. Recommended 24 June 1945 by major R.D. Grant, Acting Commanding Officer, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment (Fort Garry Horse); supported by Brigadier G.W. Robinson, Officer Commanding 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade; document held by Headquarters, Canadian Forces in the Netherlands, 29 August to 26 September 1945 when signed off by Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds.

***ORDER OF THE BRONZE LION (Holland)
Sergeant John Hyslop
Sergeant Hyslop, 10 Canadian Armoured regiment, landed on the Normandy beach head as a Troop Sergeant before H Hour on 6 June 1944. During the whole campaign in France, he distinguished himself as a cool and courageous leader of men. Though seriously wounded during the savage assault on Boulogne, he returned to the unit in time for the crossing of the River Seine. On 3 April 1945, Sergeant Hyslop’s squadron launched an attack to secure the high ground of Almen, Holland. His troop was detailed to support the advance of an infantry platoon over a small canal to seize a bridgehead. Ten minutes after crossing the canal, an enemy counter attack developed supported by self-propelled guns. Sergeant Hyslop, fully aware of the critical predicament of the small, scarcely dug-in bridgehead, determined that the ground would be held. With his first shot he destroyed the leading enemy self-propelled gun, but this one shot jammed his gun, rendering it useless for further action. Knowing full well that his vehicle was useless for further action against the enemy armour, and quite regardless of the risk, he selected to remain in his position and direct his troop. Although his vehicle received two hits, he courageously held his ground using his co-axially mounted machine gun with devastating effect on enemy infantry. Other tanks in his troop accounted for two more enemy guns, and with the loss of their armour, the enemy attack faltered and finally failed. The bridgehead was held. Sergeant Hyslop’s leadership has always ben of exceptionally high calibre, characterized by sound decisions and great courage Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/6291 dated 24 December 1945. Recommended 22 June 1945 by Major R.D. Grant, Acting Commanding Officer, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment (Fort Garry Horse) who signed it off on 23 June 1945; cleared by Brigadier G.W. Robinson, Officer Commanding 2 Canadian Armoured Brigade; document with Headquarters, Canadian Forces in the Netherlands, 29 August to 26 September 1945 when signed off by Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds.

ORDER OF THE BRONZE LION (Holland)
Lt. John James McKerrow
Lieutenant McKerrow, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment, fought as a troop leader through the latter part of the campaign in France, and through all the campaigns of Belgium, Holland and Germany. On all occasions he exhibited sound and skilful decisions coupled with courageous exploits in action. In the advance towards Nederheide, Holland, on 18 October 1944, Lieutenant McKerrow’s squadron was halted by an anti-tank screen. He was ordered by his squadron leader to make an attempt to get through the screen into the town by another approach. Lieutenant McKerrow loaded approximately two sections of infantry onto his tanks, and not only succeeded in breaking through the enemy lines by a sudden and unexpected dash, but managed to get right into the town. It was here that the leadership and courage of Lieutenant McKerrow was truly brought to the fore. No sooner was his small force into the town, than the enemy commenced desperate and savage counter-attacks. Lieutenant McKerrow organized his tanks and infantry and was entirely successful in firmly holding his ground, at the expense of many dead and wounded enemy infantry, until further reinforcements arrives. Lieutenant McKerrow has proved himself to be courageous, resourceful and a skilled tank officer. His success as a leader in action and his skill at arms has been outstanding. Awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 December 1945 and CARO/6291 dated 24 December 1945. Recommended 22 June 1945 by Major R.D. Grant, Acting Commanding Officer, 10 Canadian Armoured Regiment (Fort Garry Horse); cleared unit on 23 June 1945; with Headquarters, Canadian Forces in the Netherlands, 20 August to 26 September 1945 when signed off by Lieutenant-General G.G. Simonds.

Other Awards

Member of the Order of Canada

HCol W.J. McKeag, CM, CD
HLCol G.T. Haig, CM, MC, CD

Officer of the Order of Military Merit

Col K.L. Woiden, OMM, CD
LCol N.J. Gollmer, OMM, CD

Member of the Order of Military Merit

CWO G.T. Crossley, MMM, CD

Order of Manitoba

HCol W.J. McKeag, CM, OM, CD

Meritorious Service Medal

HCol G.C. Solar, MSM, CD

Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers

HCol R. R. Williams

King George V Jubilee Medal – 1935

LCol(ret) H. Strachan, VC, MC
LCol. J.M Dunwoody, DSO, DCM
Maj. R.G. Graham
Maj. J.S. McMahon
Maj S.J. Cox, VD
Maj F. Cockerill
Capt S.H. Muton
WO1 (RSM) E. Chivers, MM

King George VI Coronation Medal 1937

LCol(ret) H. Strachan, VC, MC
Maj. J.S. McMahon
Maj. E.B. Evans
Capt S.H. Muton
Sgt. H. Basfield
Sgt. A.C. Wells

Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal 1953

LCol(ret) H. Strachan, VC, MC
LCol C.F. Collins, CD
WO1 R.J. Forrest, CD
WO2 C. Kraayeveld, CD

Canadian Centennial Medal 1967

Col J.M. Dunwoody, DSO, DCM, ED (Colonel of the Regiment)
LCol(ret) H. Strachan, VC, MC
LCol D.A. Nicholson, CD*
LCol W.H. Willis, CD
Maj J.A.R. Gardam, CD*
Capt J.K. Marteinson*
Capt W.K. Megill*
Capt G.C. Solar
RSM (WO1) R.A. Getz, CD*
SM (WO1) L.J. George, CD*
RSM (WO1) J.M. Henderson, CD
WO2 R. Paterson, CD
WO2 A. Payer
SSM (WO2) R.J. Slaney, CD*
WO2 R. Stevenson, CD
WO2 R. H.Turnbull, CD
SSgt. P. Zasitko*
Sgt J.B. Dutton*
Sgt M. Habec*
Sgt. F.A.A. Lengyel
Sgt G.F.Towell*
Sgt E.B. Williamson*
Cpl J.L. Clancy*
Cpl G.E.J. Fox*
Cpl C.J. Lachance*
Cpl L.A. Laidlaw*
Cpl M.P.Landers*
Cpl J.M.V. Lanthier*
Cpl H.M.G. McQuaig*
Cpl J.A. Parrott*
Cpl J.M.G. Thisdelle*
Cpl C.H. Webb*
Tpr A. Dingwell*
Cfn A.J.S. Epler*
Tpr J.H.R. Glaude*
Tpr C.H. Pretty*
Tpr E.G.P. Williams*
Pte. D.R. Robbins*

* Regular Regiment

Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Medal 1977

HCol W.J. McKeag, CM, CD
LCol(ret’d) H. Strachan, VC, MC (also received British issue)
LCol G.C. Solar, CD
HLCol G.T. Haig, MC, CD
Maj B.F. McKinley
Capt S.W. Friesen
CWO R.P. Dolyniuk
Sgt D. MacGregor
MCpl L. Skidmore (RSS PPCLI)

125th Anniversary of the Confederation of Canada Medal 1992

HCol W.J. McKeag, CM, CD
Col G.C. Solar, CD
Sgt R.D. Colomy, CD
Cpl K. Shiells

Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal 2002

HCol(ret’d) W.J. McKeag, CM, CD
HCol G.C. Solar, CD
Maj G.L. Couch, CD
Capt J.B. Scott, CD
Capt K.M. Stackiw, CD
CWO G.T. Crossley, CD
Sgt D.G. Horne, CD
MCpl C.D. Machum, CD
Cpl J.J.K. Lang

Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal 2012

HCol A.B.Paterson
Col(ret’d) G.C. Solar, MSM, CD
LCol(ret’d) A.L.R. Lajeunesse, CD
LCol(ret’d) D.M. Stones, CD
HLCol R.R. Williams
Maj W.M. Johns, CD
Maj T.K. Larson, CD
Capt K.M. Houlgate
Lt S.A. Cross
CWO G.T. Crossley, CD
WO J.D. Carswell, CD
WO E.D. Gryszczuk, CD
WO K.G. MacDonald, CD
Sgt A.R. Franck, CD
Sgt J.M. Leishman, CD
Sgt P.M. Trainer
MCpl N.E. Goertzen
MCpl D.A. Tobin
Cpl V.F. Keeper
Senator R.R. Williams
Mr S. Butterworth (Tpr)

Sacrifice Medal

MCpl P.R. Cross
Cpl C.R. Froggatt

Queen’s Commendation for Brave Conduct

Cpl H.W. Hutchinson, CD (regular regt, Oct 1967)

Canadian Expeditionary Force Command Commander’s Commendataion

WO S.C. Fisher
MCpl C.D. Rediger

Joint Task Force West Commander’s Commendation

Capt K.M. Houlgate

The Fort Garry Horse Museum and Archives