Battle Honours

Battle HonoursFGH Guidon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Battle Honours in BOLD TYPE are emblazoned on the Guidon)

(Battle Honours in ITALICS are by amalgamation with The Manitoba Horse – 1936)

The North-West Rebellion 1885

  • FISH CREEK
  • BATOCHE
  • NORTH WEST CANADA – 1885

The First World War 1914-1918

  • SOMME-1916, 1918
  • BAZENTIN
  • POZIERES
  • FLERS-COURCELETTE
  • HILL 70
  • YPRES-1917
  • CAMBRAI-1917,1918
  • ST. QUENTIN
  • AMIENS
  • ARRAS-1918
  • HINDENBURG LINE
  • ST. QUENTIN CANAL
  • BEAUREVOIR
  • PURSUIT TO MONS
  • FRANCE & FLANDERS 1916-1918

The Second World War 1939-1945

  • NORMANDY LANDING
  • CAEN
  • CARPIQUET
  • FALAISE
  • FALAISE ROAD
  • THE LAISON
  • BOULOGNE-1944
  • ANTWERPP-TURNHOUT CANAL
  • THE SCHELDT
  • WOENSDRECHT
  • THE RHINELAND
  • GOCH-CALCAR ROAD
  • THE HOCHWALD
  • GRONINGEN
  • OLDENBURG
  • NORTH-WEST EUROPE 1944-1945

Post – 1945

  • AFGHANISTAN

Update:

On 9 May 2014 The Fort Garry Horse was granted the Theatre Honour “Afghanistan”. The criteria for the honour was that the unit had contributed over 20 percent of its effective strength in the geographical area of Afghanistan between 2002 and 2014. The decision on emblazonment of the Theatre Honour will be made in due course.

The Canadian Battle Honours System

The Canadian battle honour system draws on the rich heritage of the British forces. British battle honours originated with the army, which granted its first honour in 1695 and subsequently recognized honours as early as 1513 to the Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms. Some British regiments named battle honours for service in Canada, such as Louisburg 1758 and Niagara. Prior to Confederation, British authorities awarded all battle honours. After Confederation, the Canadian Militia decided on and awarded its own honours.

A battle honour is a public commemoration of a battle or campaign, the memory of which will be a constant source of pride for the unit involved. Originally, honours were never given for a defeat, an inconclusive action or a withdrawal, but exception is now made in those few cases when such an action is felt to reflect honourably upon the units involved, such as Dieppe and Hong Kong.

A Canadian Battle Honours Committee determines which Canadian regiments can claim appropriate battle honours. Each regiment in turn determines which of its battle honours are to be emblazoned on its colours or regimental appointments. To qualify for a battle honour, a unit must have been actively committed against enemy ground troops for the operation; must have been committed in the locality and within the time limits described for the honour; normally the headquarters and fifty percent of the sub-units must have been present; and/or companies operating independently and actively committed in a recognized battle may claim the award of a battle honour provided that fifty percent of the sub-unit was engaged. In this instance the regiment could claim only one award covering any one period of time.

When regiments amalgamate, the new unit inherits the honours of both predecessors. On rare occasions, amalgamated regiments separate and revert to their original form. In such a case, each component regains its own honours.

Battle honours are displayed on colours or regimental appointments. Originally, all honours could be displayed, but the number won in the lengthy campaigns of the First World War led to limits on the numbers which can now be emblazoned. These limits, which prevent overcrowding, are:

  • Prior to the First World War – no limit;
  • First World War – maximum of ten;
  • Second World War – maximum of ten;
  • Korea – maximum of two.

Battle honours are recorded and emblazoned in the official language used by each regiment. When a list of battle honours is drawn up, they are listed in descending chronological order of the engagements. When displayed on colours or other appointment, they are placed on scrolls in two columns in heir order of precedence, commencing at the top left scroll as seen from the front and alternating from left to right downwards. If the number of battle honours requires it, they may be displayed in four, rather than two columns, the order of precedence being across each of the four columns, commencing at the top left scroll as seen from the front.

The Fort Garry Horse Museum and Archives